Fast Track Finding in the ILC's Silicon Detecgor, SiD01

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A fast track finder is presented which, unlike its more efficient, more computationally costly O(n3) time counterparts, tracks particles in O(n) time (for n being the number of hits). Developed as a tool for processing data from the ILC's proposed SiD detector, development of this fast track finder began with that proposed by Pablo Yepes in 1996 and adjusted to accommodate the changes in geometry of the SiD detector. First, space within the detector is voxellated, with hits assigned to voxels according to their r, {phi}, and {eta} coordinates. A hit on the outermost layer is selected, and a 'sample ... continued below

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11 pages

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Baker, David E. & U., /Carnegie Mellon November 7, 2007.

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Description

A fast track finder is presented which, unlike its more efficient, more computationally costly O(n3) time counterparts, tracks particles in O(n) time (for n being the number of hits). Developed as a tool for processing data from the ILC's proposed SiD detector, development of this fast track finder began with that proposed by Pablo Yepes in 1996 and adjusted to accommodate the changes in geometry of the SiD detector. First, space within the detector is voxellated, with hits assigned to voxels according to their r, {phi}, and {eta} coordinates. A hit on the outermost layer is selected, and a 'sample space' is built from the hits in the selected hit's surrounding voxels. The hit in the sample space with the smallest distance to the first is then selected, and the sample space recalculated for this hit. This process continues until the list of hits becomes large enough, at which point the helical circle in the x, y plane is conformally mapped to a line in the x', y' plane, and hits are chosen from the sample spaces of the previous fit by selecting the hits which fit a line to the previously selected points with the smallest {chi}{sup 2}. Track finding terminates when the innermost layer has been reached or no hit in the sample space fits those previously selected to an acceptable {chi}{sup 2}. Again, a hit on the outermost layer is selected and the process repeats until no assignable hits remain. The algorithm proved to be very efficient on artificial diagnostic events, such as one hundred muons scattered at momenta of 1 GeV/c to 10 GeV/c. Unfortunately, when tracking simulated events corresponding to actual physics, the track finder's efficiency decreased drastically (mostly due to signal noise), though future data cleaning programs could noticeably increase its efficiency on these events.

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11 pages

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  • Journal Name: Submitted to Journal of Undergraduate Studies

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  • Report No.: SLAC-TN-07-029
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 919421
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc887061

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  • November 7, 2007

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 28, 2016, 3:04 p.m.

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Baker, David E. & U., /Carnegie Mellon. Fast Track Finding in the ILC's Silicon Detecgor, SiD01, article, November 7, 2007; [Menlo Park, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc887061/: accessed November 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.