Ecological Interactions Between Metals and Microbes That Impact Bioremediation

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Bacterial Community Diversity at a Mixed Waste Contaminated Site The correlation between bacterial population structure and lead, chromium and organic compounds present along a 21.6 m transect was examined. There was a gradient of heavy metal (Cr and Pb) and petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in these soils. A 16S rDNA analysis method and fatty acid methyl esters derived from phospholipids (PLFA) analysis were used to compare microbial communities. Soil microbial DNA was extracted and community fingerprint patterns for each sample location were produced by DGGE separation of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes amplified by PCR. Visual analysis of ... continued below

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Konopka, Allan E. June 1, 2001.

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Bacterial Community Diversity at a Mixed Waste Contaminated Site The correlation between bacterial population structure and lead, chromium and organic compounds present along a 21.6 m transect was examined. There was a gradient of heavy metal (Cr and Pb) and petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in these soils. A 16S rDNA analysis method and fatty acid methyl esters derived from phospholipids (PLFA) analysis were used to compare microbial communities. Soil microbial DNA was extracted and community fingerprint patterns for each sample location were produced by DGGE separation of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes amplified by PCR. Visual analysis of DGGE patterns indicated that sample locations with high concentrations of total toluene (12,000 mg kg-1), xylenes (8,000 mg kg-1), methylene chloride (10,000 mg kg-1), lead (17,000 mg kg-1) and chromium (3,200 mg kg-1) have a different community composition from the community with lower metals (200 mg kg-1) and organics (1200 mg kg-1) content. Microbial biomass, indicated by total phospholipid-P, was greatest in soils with highest organic contamination.

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  • Report No.: NABIR-1011901-2001
  • Grant Number: None
  • DOI: 10.2172/893871 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 893871
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc887026

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  • June 1, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 1, 2016, 10:50 a.m.

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Konopka, Allan E. Ecological Interactions Between Metals and Microbes That Impact Bioremediation, report, June 1, 2001; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc887026/: accessed September 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.