CDF Grid computing and the decay X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- with J/psi ---> e+ e-

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The main aim of physics research is to obtain a consistent description of nature leading to a detailed understanding of the phenomena observed in experiments. The field of particle physics focuses on the discovery and understanding of the fundamental particles and the forces by which they interact with each other. Using methods from group theory, the present knowledge can be mathematically described by the so-called ''Standard Model'', which interprets the fundamental particles (quarks and leptons) as quantum-mechanical fields interacting via the electromagnetic, weak and strong force. These interactions are mediated via gauge particles such as the photon (for the electromagnetic ... continued below

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194 pages

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Kerzel, Ulrich & /Karlsruhe U., EKP November 1, 2005.

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Description

The main aim of physics research is to obtain a consistent description of nature leading to a detailed understanding of the phenomena observed in experiments. The field of particle physics focuses on the discovery and understanding of the fundamental particles and the forces by which they interact with each other. Using methods from group theory, the present knowledge can be mathematically described by the so-called ''Standard Model'', which interprets the fundamental particles (quarks and leptons) as quantum-mechanical fields interacting via the electromagnetic, weak and strong force. These interactions are mediated via gauge particles such as the photon (for the electromagnetic force), W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} (for the weak force) and gluons (for the strong force). Gravitation is not yet included in this description as it presently cannot be formulated in a way to be incorporated in the Standard Model. However, the gravitational force is negligibly small on microscopic levels. The validity of this mathematical approach is tested experimentally by accelerating particles such as electrons and protons, as well as their antiparticles, to high energies and observing the reactions as these particles collide using sophisticated detectors. Due to the high energy of the particles involved, these detectors need to be as big as a small house to allow for precision measurements. Comparing the predictions from theory with the analyzed reactions observed in these collisions, the Standard Model has been established as a well-founded theory. Precision measurements from the four experiments (Aleph, Delphi, Opal, L3) the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP), operated at CERN during the years 1989-2000, allow the determination of the Standard Model parameters with enormous accuracy.

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194 pages

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-THESIS-2005-88
  • Grant Number: AC02-07CH11359
  • DOI: 10.2172/897891 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 897891
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc886909

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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  • November 1, 2005

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Dec. 2, 2016, 9:03 p.m.

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Kerzel, Ulrich & /Karlsruhe U., EKP. CDF Grid computing and the decay X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- with J/psi ---> e+ e-, thesis or dissertation, November 1, 2005; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc886909/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.