Pressure Testing of a High Temperature Naturally Fractured Reservoir

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Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted a number of pumping and flow-through tests at the Hot Dry rock (HDR) test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. These tests consisted of injecting fresh water at controlled rates up to 12 BPM (32 {ell}/s) and surface pressures up to 7,000 psi (48 MPa) into the HDR formation at depths from 10,000-13,180 feet (3050-4000 m). The formation is a naturally fractured granite at temperatures of about 250 C. The matrix porosity is < 1%and permeability is on the order of 1 nD (10 m{sup 2}). Hence most of the injected fluid is believed ... continued below

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59-63

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Kelkar, Sharad; Zyvoloski, George & Dash, Zora January 21, 1986.

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Description

Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted a number of pumping and flow-through tests at the Hot Dry rock (HDR) test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. These tests consisted of injecting fresh water at controlled rates up to 12 BPM (32 {ell}/s) and surface pressures up to 7,000 psi (48 MPa) into the HDR formation at depths from 10,000-13,180 feet (3050-4000 m). The formation is a naturally fractured granite at temperatures of about 250 C. The matrix porosity is < 1%and permeability is on the order of 1 nD (10 m{sup 2}). Hence most of the injected fluid is believed to move through fractures. there has been no evidence of fracture breakdown phenomena, and hence it is believed that pre-existing joints in the formation are opened by fluid injection. Water losses during pumping are significant, most likely resulting from flow into secondary fractures intersecting the main fluid conducting paths. The pressure-time response observed in these tests can be interpreted in terms of non-isothermal, fracture-dominated flow. As the fluid pressure increases from small values to those comparable to fracturing pressures, the formation response changes from linear fracture flow to the highly nonlinear situation where fracture lift off occurs. A numerical heat and mass flow model was used to match the observed pressure response. Good matches were obtained for pressure build up and shut-in data by assigning pressure dependent fracture and leak-off permeabilities.

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59-63

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  • Proceedings, Eleventh Workshop Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 21-23, 1986

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  • Report No.: SGP-TR-93-9
  • Grant Number: AS03-80SF11459
  • Grant Number: AS07-84ID12529
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 887089
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc886244

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • January 21, 1986

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Nov. 3, 2016, 11:44 a.m.

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Kelkar, Sharad; Zyvoloski, George & Dash, Zora. Pressure Testing of a High Temperature Naturally Fractured Reservoir, article, January 21, 1986; Los Alamos, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc886244/: accessed December 14, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.