Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells

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There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells ... continued below

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Liber, Howard L. & Schwartz, Jeffrey L. October 31, 2005.

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There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells has been to isolate individual clones and analyze gene and chromosome mutation frequencies in each. This approach maximizes the possibility of detecting low frequency events that might be selected against in mass cultures.

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1 image; 9-pages; 54kb;

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  • Report No.: DOE-ER63365-Final
  • Grant Number: FG03-02ER63365
  • DOI: 10.2172/887495 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 887495
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc885484

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  • October 31, 2005

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Nov. 4, 2016, 2:42 p.m.

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Liber, Howard L. & Schwartz, Jeffrey L. Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells, report, October 31, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc885484/: accessed August 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.