Reservoir environment of the Onuma geothermal power plant, northeast Japan, estimated by forward analysis of long-term artificial-tracer concentration change, using single-box-model simulator

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

A single-box-model numerical simulator for personal computer analysis was developed in order to estimate macroscopic parameter values for exploited geothermal reservoirs and essential fluids coming from the depth. The simulator was designed to compute history data concerning total production and reinjection fluids at geothermal power plants from the assumed parameter values, based on conservation laws for water mass, heat energy and masses of conservative chemical constituents of geothermal fluids. Using two kinds of forward analysis techniques, i.e. the cast-net and pursuit methods, programs containing the simulator can semiautomatically select the optimum combination of the unknown parameter values by minimizing the ... continued below

Physical Description

135-140

Creation Information

Shigeno, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaaki & Tetsuro, Noda January 28, 1993.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 12 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

A single-box-model numerical simulator for personal computer analysis was developed in order to estimate macroscopic parameter values for exploited geothermal reservoirs and essential fluids coming from the depth. The simulator was designed to compute history data concerning total production and reinjection fluids at geothermal power plants from the assumed parameter values, based on conservation laws for water mass, heat energy and masses of conservative chemical constituents of geothermal fluids. Using two kinds of forward analysis techniques, i.e. the cast-net and pursuit methods, programs containing the simulator can semiautomatically select the optimum combination of the unknown parameter values by minimizing the differences between the simulated and measured history data for specific enthalpy and chemical compositions of the production fluids. The forward analysis programs were applied to the history data from the Onuma geothermal power plant (production capacity, 10MWe) where waste hot water reinjection, chemical monitoring and artificial tracer tests have been conducted since 1970, almost the beginning of the geothermal exploitation. Using the history data, enthalpy and iodine concentrations of the total production fluids with the amounts of KI tracer injected as spikes, the macroscopic parameter values for the exploited reservoir and the essential hot water from the depth were uniquely determined as follows: mass of the hot water convecting in the exploited reservoir (M0), 3.23x10<sup>9</sup>kg; recycling fraction of the reinjected waste hot water to the reservoir (R), 0.74; specific enthalpy of the essential water from the depth (H1), 385kcalkg; iodine concentration of the water (I1), 0.086mg/kg with chlorine concentration (C1), 259mg/kg. These results support the conceptual model that the exploited Onuma reservoir mainly in the Tertiary volcanics is supplied with the neutral Na-Cl type hot water of abnormally high B/CI mole ratio of around 1.0 by a large essential reservoir distributed at depth in the Paleozoic to Mesozoic detrital marine sedimentary rocks.

Physical Description

135-140

Subjects

Source

  • Proceedings, eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, January 26-28, 1993

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: SGP-TR-145-19
  • Grant Number: None
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 888913
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc885113

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • January 28, 1993

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 7, 2016, 8:32 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 2
Total Uses: 12

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Shigeno, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaaki & Tetsuro, Noda. Reservoir environment of the Onuma geothermal power plant, northeast Japan, estimated by forward analysis of long-term artificial-tracer concentration change, using single-box-model simulator, article, January 28, 1993; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc885113/: accessed November 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.