A geoneutrino experiment at Homestake

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A significant fraction of the 44 TW of heat dissipation from the Earth's interior is believed to originate from the decays of terrestrial uranium and thorium. The only estimates of this radiogenic heat, which is the driving force for mantle convection, come from Earth models based on meteorites, and have large systematic errors. The detection of electron antineutrinos produced by these uranium and thorium decays would allow a more direct measure of the total uranium and thorium content, and hence radiogenic heat production in the Earth. They discuss the prospect of building an electron antineutrino detector approximately 700 m{sup 3} ... continued below

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Tolich, Nikolai; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Currat, Charles A.; Decowski, M.Patrick; Fujikawa, Brian K.; Henning, Reyco et al. May 31, 2006.

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A significant fraction of the 44 TW of heat dissipation from the Earth's interior is believed to originate from the decays of terrestrial uranium and thorium. The only estimates of this radiogenic heat, which is the driving force for mantle convection, come from Earth models based on meteorites, and have large systematic errors. The detection of electron antineutrinos produced by these uranium and thorium decays would allow a more direct measure of the total uranium and thorium content, and hence radiogenic heat production in the Earth. They discuss the prospect of building an electron antineutrino detector approximately 700 m{sup 3} in size in the Homestake mine at the 4850 feet level. This would allow us to make a measurement of the total uranium and thorium content with a statistical error less than the systematic error from the current knowledge of neutrino oscillation parameters. It would also allow us to test the hypothesis of a naturally occurring nuclear reactor at the center of the Earth.

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  • Neutrino Sciences 2005, Honolulu, Hawaii,December 14-16, 2005

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  • Report No.: LBNL--60311
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 890648
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc883983

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  • May 31, 2006

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Sept. 29, 2016, 2:47 p.m.

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Tolich, Nikolai; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Currat, Charles A.; Decowski, M.Patrick; Fujikawa, Brian K.; Henning, Reyco et al. A geoneutrino experiment at Homestake, article, May 31, 2006; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc883983/: accessed August 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.