The Effect of Filler-Polymer Interactions on Cold-Crystallization Kinetics in Crosslinked, Silica Filled PDMS/PDPS Copolymer Melts.

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Crystallization in a series of variable crosslink density poly(dimethyl-diphenyl) siloxanes random block copolymers reinforced through a mixture of precipitated and fumed silica fillers has been studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The silicone composite studied was composed of 94.6 mol% Dimethoylsiloxane, 5.1 mol% diphenylsiloxane, and 0.3 mol% methyl-vinyl siloxane (which formed crosslinking after a peroxide cure). The polymer was filled with a mixture of 21.6 wt. % fumed silica and 4.0 wt. % precipitated silica previously treated with 6.8 wt. % ethoxy-endblocked siloxane processing aid. The base composite was characterized by a ... continued below

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Chien, A; DeTeresa, S; Thompson, L; Cohenour, R; Balazs, B & Maxwell, R S April 21, 2006.

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Crystallization in a series of variable crosslink density poly(dimethyl-diphenyl) siloxanes random block copolymers reinforced through a mixture of precipitated and fumed silica fillers has been studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The silicone composite studied was composed of 94.6 mol% Dimethoylsiloxane, 5.1 mol% diphenylsiloxane, and 0.3 mol% methyl-vinyl siloxane (which formed crosslinking after a peroxide cure). The polymer was filled with a mixture of 21.6 wt. % fumed silica and 4.0 wt. % precipitated silica previously treated with 6.8 wt. % ethoxy-endblocked siloxane processing aid. The base composite was characterized by a molecular weight between crosslinks in the polymer network of {approx}24 kDa and an overall molecular weight (including the influence of the silica fillers) between crosslinks of {approx}11 kDa. Molecular weight between crosslinks and filler-polymer interaction strength were then modified by exposure to {gamma}-irradiation in either air or vacuum. The unirradiated material exhibited crystallization at -80 C as measured by DSC with a 16% crystallization as measured by XRD. Isothermal DMA experiments illustrated that crystallization at -85 C occurred over a 1.8 hour period in silica-filled systems and 2.2-2.6 hours in unfilled systems. The onset of crystallization typically occurred after a 30-minute incubation/nucleation period. The crystallization kinetics were dependent on crosslink density. Changes in molecular weight of a factor of two did not, however, change the amount of crystallization. Irradiation in vacuum resulted in faster overall crystallization rates compared to air irradiation for the same crosslink density, likely due to a reduction in the interaction between the polymer chains and the silica filler surface. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry contrasted the crystallization and melting behavior of pure PDMS versus the PDMS/PDPS base copolymer and helped determine which component of the composite was the origin of the crystallization phenomena.

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PDF-file: 31 pages; size: 0.4 Mbytes

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Polymer Science, Part B: Polymer Physics, vol. 44, no. 13, July 1, 2006, pp. 1898-1906

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JRNL-220857
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 897925
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc883685

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  • April 21, 2006

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 23, 2016, 5:17 p.m.

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Chien, A; DeTeresa, S; Thompson, L; Cohenour, R; Balazs, B & Maxwell, R S. The Effect of Filler-Polymer Interactions on Cold-Crystallization Kinetics in Crosslinked, Silica Filled PDMS/PDPS Copolymer Melts., article, April 21, 2006; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc883685/: accessed April 26, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.