Meeting Report. Assessing Human Germ-Cell Mutagenesis in thePost-Genome Era: A Celebration of the Legacy of William Lawson (Bill)Russell

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Although numerous germ-cell mutagens have been identified inanimal model systems, to date, no human germ-cell mutagens have beenconfirmed. Because the genomic integrity of our germ cells is essentialfor the continuation of the human species, a resolution of this enduringconundrum is needed. To facilitate such a resolution, we organized aworkshop at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine on September28-30, 2004. This interactive workshop brought together scientists from awide range of disciplines to assess the applicability of emergingmolecular methods for genomic analysis to the field of human germ-cellmutagenesis. Participants recommended that focused, coordinated humangerm-cell mutation studies be conducted in relation to ... continued below

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Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Mulvihill, John J.; Wassom, John S.; Malling,Heinrich V.; Shelby, Michael D.; Lewis, Susan E. et al. April 18, 2006.

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Although numerous germ-cell mutagens have been identified inanimal model systems, to date, no human germ-cell mutagens have beenconfirmed. Because the genomic integrity of our germ cells is essentialfor the continuation of the human species, a resolution of this enduringconundrum is needed. To facilitate such a resolution, we organized aworkshop at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine on September28-30, 2004. This interactive workshop brought together scientists from awide range of disciplines to assess the applicability of emergingmolecular methods for genomic analysis to the field of human germ-cellmutagenesis. Participants recommended that focused, coordinated humangerm-cell mutation studies be conducted in relation to important societalexposures. Because cancer survivors represent a unique cohort withwell-defined exposures, there was a consensus that studies should bedesigned to assess the mutational impact on children born to parents whohad received certain types of mutagenic cancer chemotherapy prior toconceiving their children. Within this high-risk cohort, parents andchildren could be evaluated for inherited changes in (a) gene sequencesand chromosomal structure, (b) repeat sequences and minisatelliteregions, and (c) global gene expression and chromatin. Participants alsorecommended studies to examine trans-generational effects in humansinvolving mechanisms such as changes in imprinting and methylationpatterns, expansion of nucleotide repeats, or induction of mitochondrialDNA mutations. Workshop participants advocated establishment of abio-bank of human tissue samples that could be used to conduct amultiple-endpoint, comprehensive, and collaborative effort to detectexposure-induced heritable alterations in the human genome. Appropriateanimal models of human germ-cell mutagenes is should be used in parallelwith human studies to provide insights into the mechanisms of mammaliangerm-cell mutagenesis. Finally, participants recommended that scientificspecialty groups be convened to address specific questions regarding thepotential germ-cell mutagenicity of environmental, occupational, andlifestyle exposures. Strong support from relevant funding agencies andengagement of scientists outside the fields of genomics and germ-cellmutagenesis will be required to launch a full-scale assault on some ofthe most pressing and enduring questions in environmental mutagenesis: Dohuman germ-cell mutagens exist, what risk do they pose to futuregenerations, and are some parents at higher risk than others foracquiring and transmitting germ-cell mutations?

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  • Journal Name: Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis; Journal Volume: 48; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 03/2007

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  • Report No.: LBNL--60026
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 919508
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc883541

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  • April 18, 2006

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Sept. 29, 2016, 3:11 p.m.

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Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Mulvihill, John J.; Wassom, John S.; Malling,Heinrich V.; Shelby, Michael D.; Lewis, Susan E. et al. Meeting Report. Assessing Human Germ-Cell Mutagenesis in thePost-Genome Era: A Celebration of the Legacy of William Lawson (Bill)Russell, article, April 18, 2006; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc883541/: accessed August 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.