Integrated superhard and metallic coatings for MEMS : LDRD 57300 final report.

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Two major research areas pertinent to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials and material surfaces were explored and developed in this 5-year PECASE LDRD project carried out by Professor Roya Maboudian and her collaborators at the University of California at Berkeley. In the first research area, polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC) was developed as a structural material for MEMS. This material is potentially interesting for MEMS because compared to polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon), the structural material in Sandia National Laboratories' SUMMiTV process, it may exhibit high wear resistance, high temperature operation and a high Young's modulus to density ratio. Each of these characteristics may ... continued below

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21 p.

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de Boer, Maarten Pieter & Maboudian, Roya (University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.) December 1, 2004.

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Description

Two major research areas pertinent to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials and material surfaces were explored and developed in this 5-year PECASE LDRD project carried out by Professor Roya Maboudian and her collaborators at the University of California at Berkeley. In the first research area, polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC) was developed as a structural material for MEMS. This material is potentially interesting for MEMS because compared to polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon), the structural material in Sandia National Laboratories' SUMMiTV process, it may exhibit high wear resistance, high temperature operation and a high Young's modulus to density ratio. Each of these characteristics may extend the usefulness of MEMS in Sandia National Laboratories' applications. For example, using polycrystalline silicon, wear is an important issue in microengines, temperature degradation is of concern in thermal actuators and the characteristics of resonators can be extended with the same lithography technology. Two methods of depositing poly-SiC from a 1,3-disilabutane source at 650 C to 800 C by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) were demonstrated. These include a blanket method in which the material is made entirely out of poly-SiC and a method to coat previously released and fabricated polysilicon MEMS. This deposition method is much simpler to use than previous methods such as high temperature LPCVD and atmospheric CVD. Other major processing issues that were surmounted in this LDRD with the poly-SiC film include etching, doping, and residual strain control. SiC is inert and as such is notoriously difficult to etch. Here, an HBr-based chemistry was demonstrated for the first time to make highly selective etching of SiC at high etch rates. Nitrogen was incorporated from an NH3 gas source, resulting in high conductivity films. Residual strain and strain gradient were shown to depend on deposition parameters, and can be made negative or positive. The tribology of poly-SiC was also investigated. Much improved release stiction and in-use stiction performance relative to polysilicon MEMS was found. Furthermore, wear of poly-SiC-coated MEMS was much reduced relative to uncoated polysilicon MEMS. A prototype baseline process flow now exists to produce poly-SiC in the Berkeley Sensor and Actuator (BSAC) facility. In the second project, galvanic deposition of metals onto polysilicon surfaces has been developed. The possible applications include reflective and optical coatings for optical MEMS, microswitches and microrelays for radio frequency MEMS and catalytic surfaces for microchemical reactors. In contrast to electroless deposition, galvanic displacement deposition requires no prior activation of the surface and is truly selective to silicon surfaces. This approach was used to deposit copper, gold and rhodium onto polysilicon MEMS. A method to study the adhesion of these metals to polysilicon was developed. It was also shown that the surfaces could be rendered hydrophobic by applying thiol-based self-assembled monolayers. This procedure also lowered their surface energy to {approx}3 {micro}J/m{sup 2}, consistent with monolayer-coated polysilicon MEMS.

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21 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2004-6074
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/919192 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 919192
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc883483

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  • December 1, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 29, 2016, 4:04 p.m.

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de Boer, Maarten Pieter & Maboudian, Roya (University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.). Integrated superhard and metallic coatings for MEMS : LDRD 57300 final report., report, December 1, 2004; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc883483/: accessed May 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.