A METHOD FOR SELECTING SOFTWARE FOR DYNAMIC EVENT ANALYSIS I: PROBLEM SELECTION

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New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks, as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and ... continued below

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Lacy, J. M.; Novascone, S. R.; Richins, W. D. & Larson, T. K. August 1, 2007.

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New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks, as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and structure. In this paper, we present a method for systematically comparing current high-energy physics codes for specific applications in new reactor design. Several codes are available for the study of blast, impact, and other shock phenomena. Historically, these packages were developed to study specific phenomena such as explosives performance, penetrator/target interaction, or accidental impacts. As developers generalize the capabilities of their software, legacy biases and assumptions can remain that could affect the applicability of the code to other processes and phenomena. R&D institutions generally adopt one or two software packages and use them almost exclusively, performing benchmarks on a single-problem basis. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), new comparative information was desired to permit researchers to select the best code for a particular application by matching its characteristics to the physics, materials, and rate scale (or scales) representing the problem at hand. A study was undertaken to investigate the comparative characteristics of a group of shock and high-strain rate physics codes including ABAQUS, LS-DYNA, CTH, ALEGRA, ALE-3D, and RADIOSS. A series of benchmark problems were identified to exercise the features and capabilities of the subject software. To be useful, benchmark problems require several features. They should be; 1) small, requiring reasonable computer resources, 2) designed to engage a small set of physical phenomena, 3) independent of code formulation, 4) verifiable, either by closed-form solution or experimental result, and 5) unlimited in distribution. This paper presents the selection rationale and problems chosen for the benchmarking suite exhibiting the above features. Detailed discussion of the benchmark study results will be presented in future reports.

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  • Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology (SMiRT 19),Toronto, Canada,08/12/2007,08/17/2007

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  • Report No.: INL/CON-07-12650
  • Grant Number: DE-AC07-99ID-13727
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 915532
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc883417

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  • August 1, 2007

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 29, 2016, 8:03 p.m.

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Lacy, J. M.; Novascone, S. R.; Richins, W. D. & Larson, T. K. A METHOD FOR SELECTING SOFTWARE FOR DYNAMIC EVENT ANALYSIS I: PROBLEM SELECTION, article, August 1, 2007; [Idaho Falls, Idaho]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc883417/: accessed November 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.