Recyclable transmission line concept for z-pinch driven inertial fusion energy.

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Recyclable transmission lines (RTL)s are being studied as a means to repetitively drive z pinches to generate fusion energy. We have shown previously that the RTL mass can be quite modest. Minimizing the RTL mass reduces recycling costs and the impulse delivered to the first wall of a fusion chamber. Despite this reduction in mass, a few seconds will be needed to reload an RTL after each subsequent shot. This is in comparison to other inertial fusion approaches that expect to fire up to ten capsules per second. Thus a larger fusion yield is needed to compensate for the slower ... continued below

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36 p.

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De Groot, J. S. (University of California, Davis, CA); Olson, Craig Lee; Cochrane, Kyle Robert (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan & Peterson, Per F. (University of California, Berkeley, CA) December 1, 2003.

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Description

Recyclable transmission lines (RTL)s are being studied as a means to repetitively drive z pinches to generate fusion energy. We have shown previously that the RTL mass can be quite modest. Minimizing the RTL mass reduces recycling costs and the impulse delivered to the first wall of a fusion chamber. Despite this reduction in mass, a few seconds will be needed to reload an RTL after each subsequent shot. This is in comparison to other inertial fusion approaches that expect to fire up to ten capsules per second. Thus a larger fusion yield is needed to compensate for the slower repetition rate in a z-pinch driven fusion reactor. We present preliminary designs of z-pinch driven fusion capsules that provide an adequate yield of 1-4 GJ. We also present numerical simulations of the effect of these fairly large fusion yields on the RTL and the first wall of the reactor chamber. These simulations were performed with and without a neutron absorbing blanket surrounding the fusion explosion. We find that the RTL will be fully vaporized out to a radius of about 3 meters assuming normal incidence. However, at large enough radius the RTL will remain in either the liquid or solid state and this portion of the RTL could fragment and become shrapnel. We show that a dynamic fragmentation theory can be used to estimate the size of these fragmented particles. We discuss how proper design of the RTL can allow this shrapnel to be directed away from the sensitive mechanical parts of the reactor chamber.

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36 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2003-4551
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/918210 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 918210
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc883235

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • December 1, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Dec. 7, 2016, 8:19 p.m.

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De Groot, J. S. (University of California, Davis, CA); Olson, Craig Lee; Cochrane, Kyle Robert (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan & Peterson, Per F. (University of California, Berkeley, CA). Recyclable transmission line concept for z-pinch driven inertial fusion energy., report, December 1, 2003; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc883235/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.