Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays: applications, fundamentals, and optimization

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive ... continued below

Physical Description

4536kb

Creation Information

Driskell, Jeremy Daniel August 9, 2006.

Context

This thesis or dissertation is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 24 times . More information about this document can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this thesis or dissertation or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this thesis or dissertation. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments of SPR and SERS. Chapter 4 introduces a novel method of reducing sample incubation time via capture substrate rotation. Moreover, this work led to a method of virus quantification without the use of standards. Chapter 5 extends the methodology developed in Chapter 4 to both the antigen and ERL labeling step to perform assays with improved analytical performance in less time than can be accomplished in diffusion controlled assays. This dissertation concludes with a general summary and speculates on the future of this exciting approach to carrying out immunoassays.

Physical Description

4536kb

Language

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this document in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: IS-T 2819
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-82
  • DOI: 10.2172/892727 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 892727
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc882316

Collections

This document is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this thesis or dissertation?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this thesis or dissertation.

Creation Date

  • August 9, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Sept. 21, 2017, 8:50 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this document last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 24

Interact With This Thesis Or Dissertation

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Driskell, Jeremy Daniel. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays: applications, fundamentals, and optimization, thesis or dissertation, August 9, 2006; Ames, Iowa. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc882316/: accessed January 22, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.