The impact of an observationally based surface emissivity dataset on the simulation of Microwave Sounding Unit Temperatures

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Relatively few studies have attempted to simulate synthetic MSU temperatures with use of a radiation model. Most employ the simpler and computationally less-expensive method of applying a static, global-mean weighting function to three-dimensional profiles of atmospheric temperature. Both approaches require a number of key assumptions. One of the major assumptions relates to surface emissivity. To date, two different strategies have been used for prescribing surface emissivity values. The first assumes a fixed global surface emissivity, while the second specifies separate (time-invariant) emissivity values for land and ocean. In this research, we introduce space- and time-dependence to the specified emissivity fields, ... continued below

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Hnilo, J J; Litten, L; Santer, B D & Christy, J R August 15, 2005.

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Relatively few studies have attempted to simulate synthetic MSU temperatures with use of a radiation model. Most employ the simpler and computationally less-expensive method of applying a static, global-mean weighting function to three-dimensional profiles of atmospheric temperature. Both approaches require a number of key assumptions. One of the major assumptions relates to surface emissivity. To date, two different strategies have been used for prescribing surface emissivity values. The first assumes a fixed global surface emissivity, while the second specifies separate (time-invariant) emissivity values for land and ocean. In this research, we introduce space- and time-dependence to the specified emissivity fields, using recent observationally-based estimates of surface emissivity changes over 1988 to 2000. We use a radiative transfer code to explore the impact of this more complex treatment of surface emissivity. This sensitivity analysis is performed with monthly-mean fields of surface temperature, atmospheric temperature, and moisture taken from multiple reanalyses. Our goal is to quantify the possible impact of emissivity changes on global-scale estimates of tropospheric temperature trends (e.g., trends estimated from MSU channel 2 and MSU 2LT), and to document the sensitivity of synthetic MSU temperatures to a variety of input data and processing choices.

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PDF-file: 3 pages; size: 54.8 Kbytes

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  • Presented at: 86th American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, United States, Jan 29 - Feb 02, 2006

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  • Report No.: UCRL-CONF-214619
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 917889
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc881664

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  • August 15, 2005

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Dec. 7, 2016, 3:24 p.m.

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Hnilo, J J; Litten, L; Santer, B D & Christy, J R. The impact of an observationally based surface emissivity dataset on the simulation of Microwave Sounding Unit Temperatures, article, August 15, 2005; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc881664/: accessed October 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.