Kinetics of HMX and CP Decomposition and Their Extrapolation for Lifetime Assessment

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Accelerated aging tests play an important role in assessing the lifetime of manufactured products. There are two basic approaches to lifetime qualification. One tests a product to failure over range of accelerated conditions to calibrate a model, which is then used to calculate the failure time for conditions of use. A second approach is to test a component to a lifetime-equivalent dose (thermal or radiation) to see if it still functions to specification. Both methods have their advantages and limitations. A disadvantage of the 2nd method is that one does not know how close one is to incipient failure. This ... continued below

Physical Description

7 p. (0.3 MB)

Creation Information

Burnham, A K; Weese, R K & Adrzejewski, W J September 11, 2006.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Accelerated aging tests play an important role in assessing the lifetime of manufactured products. There are two basic approaches to lifetime qualification. One tests a product to failure over range of accelerated conditions to calibrate a model, which is then used to calculate the failure time for conditions of use. A second approach is to test a component to a lifetime-equivalent dose (thermal or radiation) to see if it still functions to specification. Both methods have their advantages and limitations. A disadvantage of the 2nd method is that one does not know how close one is to incipient failure. This limitation can be mitigated by testing to some higher level of dose as a safety margin, but having a predictive model of failure via the 1st approach provides an additional measure of confidence. Even so, proper calibration of a failure model is non-trivial, and the extrapolated failure predictions are only as good as the model and the quality of the calibration. This paper outlines results for predicting the potential failure point of a system involving a mixture of two energetic materials, HMX (nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) and CP (2-(5-cyanotetrazalato) pentaammine cobalt (III) perchlorate). Global chemical kinetic models for the two materials individually and as a mixture are developed and calibrated from a variety of experiments. These include traditional thermal analysis experiments run on time scales from hours to a couple days, detonator aging experiments with exposures up to 50 months, and sealed-tube aging experiments for up to 5 years. Decomposition kinetics are determined for HMX (nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) and CP (2-(5-cyanotetrazalato) pentaammine cobalt (III) perchlorate) separately and together. For high levels of thermal stress, the two materials decompose faster as a mixture than individually. This effect is observed both in high-temperature thermal analysis experiments and in long-term thermal aging experiments. An Arrhenius plot of the 10% level of HMX decomposition by itself from a diverse set of experiments is linear from 120 to 260 C, with an apparent activation energy of 165 kJ/mol. Similar but less extensive thermal analysis data for the mixture suggests a slightly lower activation energy for the mixture, and an analogous extrapolation is consistent with the amount of gas observed in the long-term detonator aging experiments, which is about 30 times greater than expected from HMX by itself for 50 months at 100 C. Even with this acceleration, however, it would take {approx}10,000 years to achieve 10% decomposition at {approx}30 C. Correspondingly, negligible decomposition is predicted by this kinetic model for a few decades aging at temperatures slightly above ambient. This prediction is consistent with additional sealed-tube aging experiments at 100-120 C, which are estimated to have an effective thermal dose greater than that from decades of exposure to temperatures slightly above ambient.

Physical Description

7 p. (0.3 MB)

Notes

PDF-file: 7 pages; size: 0.3 Mbytes

Source

  • Presented at: 27th Aging, Compatibility and Stockpile Stewardship Conference, Los Alamos, NM, United States, Sep 26 - Sep 28, 2006

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: UCRL-CONF-224413
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 894353
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc880455

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • September 11, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 17, 2017, 12:58 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 2

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Burnham, A K; Weese, R K & Adrzejewski, W J. Kinetics of HMX and CP Decomposition and Their Extrapolation for Lifetime Assessment, article, September 11, 2006; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc880455/: accessed December 10, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.