THE ROLE OF DEAD WOOD IN MAINTAINING ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY ON THE FOREST FLOOR.

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Abstract—Dead wood is a major component of forests and contributes to overall diversity, primarily by supporting insects that feed directly on or in it. Further, a variety of organisms benefit by feeding on those insects. What is not well known is how or whether dead wood influences the composition of the arthropod community that is not solely dependent on it as a food resource, or whether woody debris influences prey available to generalist predators. One group likely to be affected by dead wood is ground-dwelling arthropods. We studied the effect of adding large dead wood to unburned and frequently burned ... continued below

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Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott & Wade, Dale D. August 1, 2006.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 57 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Savannah River Forest Station
    Publisher Info: USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC
    Place of Publication: New Ellenton, South Carolina

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Abstract—Dead wood is a major component of forests and contributes to overall diversity, primarily by supporting insects that feed directly on or in it. Further, a variety of organisms benefit by feeding on those insects. What is not well known is how or whether dead wood influences the composition of the arthropod community that is not solely dependent on it as a food resource, or whether woody debris influences prey available to generalist predators. One group likely to be affected by dead wood is ground-dwelling arthropods. We studied the effect of adding large dead wood to unburned and frequently burned pine stands to determine if dead wood was used more when the litter and understory plant community are removed. We also studied the effect of annual removal of dead wood from large (10-ha) plots over a 5-year period on ground-dwelling arthropods. In related studies, we examined the relationships among an endangered woodpecker that forages for prey on live trees, its prey, and dead wood in the forest. The results of these and other studies show that dead wood can influence the abundance and diversity of the ground-dwelling arthropod community and of prey available to generalist predators not foraging directly on dead trees.

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57-66

Source

  • Insect biodiversity and dead wood: proceedings of a symposium for the 22nd International Congress of Entomology. Brisbane, Australia. August 15-21, 2004. Grove, Simon J.; Hanula, James L., eds. 2006. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-93. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 109 p.

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  • Report No.: na
  • Grant Number: AI09-00SR22188
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 896222
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc880363

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • August 1, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 1, 2016, 6:15 p.m.

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Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott & Wade, Dale D. THE ROLE OF DEAD WOOD IN MAINTAINING ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY ON THE FOREST FLOOR., article, August 1, 2006; New Ellenton, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc880363/: accessed May 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.