Effect of Geochemical and Physical Heterogeneity on the Hanford 100D Area In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Longevity

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The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of physical and/or geochemical heterogeneities in the Hanford 100D area In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier, which may be contributing to the discontinuous chromate breakthrough locations along the 65-well (2,300 ft long) barrier. Possible causes of chromate breakthrough that were investigated during this study include: (1) high hydraulic conductivity zones; (2) zones of low reducible iron; and (3) high hydraulic conductivity zones with low reducible iron. This laboratory-scale investigation utilized geochemical and physical characterization data collected on 0.5 to 1 foot intervals from four borehole locations. Results of this laboratory ... continued below

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Szecsody, Jim E.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Devary, Brooks J. et al. November 30, 2005.

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The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of physical and/or geochemical heterogeneities in the Hanford 100D area In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier, which may be contributing to the discontinuous chromate breakthrough locations along the 65-well (2,300 ft long) barrier. Possible causes of chromate breakthrough that were investigated during this study include: (1) high hydraulic conductivity zones; (2) zones of low reducible iron; and (3) high hydraulic conductivity zones with low reducible iron. This laboratory-scale investigation utilized geochemical and physical characterization data collected on 0.5 to 1 foot intervals from four borehole locations. Results of this laboratory study did not provide definitive support any of the proposed hypotheses for explaining chromate breakthrough at the Hanford 100-D Area ISRM barrier. While site characterization data indicate a significant degree of vertical variability in both physical and geochemical properties in the four boreholes investigated, lateral continuity of high conductivity/low reductive capacity zones was not observed. The one exception was at the water table, where low reductive capacity and high-K zones were observed in 3 of four boreholes. Laterally continuous high permeability zones that contain oxic sediment near the water table is the most likely explanation for high concentration chromium breakthrough responses observed at various locations along the barrier. A mechanism that could explain partial chromate breakthrough in the ISRM barrier is the relationship between the field reductive capacity and the rate of chromate oxidation. Subsurface zones with low reductive capacity still have sufficient ferrous iron mass to reduce considerable chromate, but the rate of chromate reduction slows by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude relative to sediments with moderate to high reductive capacity. The original barrier longevity estimate of 160 pore volumes for homogeneous reduced sediment, or approximately 20 years, (with 5 mg/L dissolved oxygen and 2 ppm chromate) is reduced to 85 pore volumes (10 years) when the wide spread 60 ppm nitrate plume is included in the calculation. However, this reduction in barrier lifetime is not as great for high permeability channels, as there is insufficient time to reduce nitrate (and consume ferrous iron). If the cause of laterally discontinuous breakthrough of chromate along the ISRM barrier is due to oxic transport of chromate near the water table, additional dithionite treatment in these zones will not be effective. Treatment near the water table with a technology that emplaces considerable reductive capacity is needed, such as injectable zero valent iron.

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  • Report No.: PNNL-15499
  • Grant Number: AC05-76RL01830
  • DOI: 10.2172/877065 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 877065
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc878682

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  • November 30, 2005

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Nov. 23, 2016, 5:17 p.m.

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Szecsody, Jim E.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Devary, Brooks J. et al. Effect of Geochemical and Physical Heterogeneity on the Hanford 100D Area In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Longevity, report, November 30, 2005; Richland, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc878682/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.