Modeling aerosol-cloud interactions with a self-consistent cloud scheme in a general circulation model

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This paper describes a self-consistent prognostic cloud scheme that is able to predict cloud liquid water, amount and droplet number (N{sub d}) from the same updraft velocity field, and is suitable for modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in general circulation models (GCMs). In the scheme, the evolution of droplets fully interacts with the model meteorology. An explicit treatment of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation allows the scheme to take into account the contributions to N{sub d} of multiple types of aerosol (i.e., sulfate, organic and sea-salt aerosols) and kinetic limitations of the activation process. An implementation of the prognostic scheme in the ... continued below

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Ming, Y; Ramaswamy, V; Donner, L J; Phillips, V T; Klein, S A; Ginoux, P A et al. May 2, 2005.

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This paper describes a self-consistent prognostic cloud scheme that is able to predict cloud liquid water, amount and droplet number (N{sub d}) from the same updraft velocity field, and is suitable for modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in general circulation models (GCMs). In the scheme, the evolution of droplets fully interacts with the model meteorology. An explicit treatment of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation allows the scheme to take into account the contributions to N{sub d} of multiple types of aerosol (i.e., sulfate, organic and sea-salt aerosols) and kinetic limitations of the activation process. An implementation of the prognostic scheme in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) AM2 GCM yields a vertical distribution of N{sub d} characteristic of maxima in the lower troposphere differing from that obtained through diagnosing N{sub d} empirically from sulfate mass concentrations. As a result, the agreement of model-predicted present-day cloud parameters with satellite measurements is improved compared to using diagnosed N{sub d}. The simulations with pre-industrial and present-day aerosols show that the combined first and second indirect effects of anthropogenic sulfate and organic aerosols give rise to a global annual mean flux change of -1.8 W m{sup -2} consisting of -2.0 W m{sup -2} in shortwave and 0.2 W m{sup -2} in longwave, as model response alters cloud field, and subsequently longwave radiation. Liquid water path (LWP) and total cloud amount increase by 19% and 0.6%, respectively. Largely owing to high sulfate concentrations from fossil fuel burning, the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude land and oceans experience strong cooling. So does the tropical land which is dominated by biomass burning organic aerosol. The Northern/Southern Hemisphere and land/ocean ratios are 3.1 and 1.4, respectively. The calculated annual zonal mean flux changes are determined to be statistically significant, exceeding the model's natural variations in the NH low and mid-latitudes and in the SH low latitudes. Anthropogenic sulfate aerosol alone causes an annual mean flux change of -1.1 W m{sup -2}.

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PDF-file: 60 pages; size: 4.1 Mbytes

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, vol. 64, no. 4, April 17, 2007, pp. 1189-1209; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 4

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JRNL-211920
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 907860
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc878103

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • May 2, 2005

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  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Nov. 29, 2016, 8:16 p.m.

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Ming, Y; Ramaswamy, V; Donner, L J; Phillips, V T; Klein, S A; Ginoux, P A et al. Modeling aerosol-cloud interactions with a self-consistent cloud scheme in a general circulation model, article, May 2, 2005; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc878103/: accessed September 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.