Dynamics of metal/ceramic interface formation.

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We summarize the work of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 'Dynamics of Metal/Ceramic Interface Formation.' Low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) was used to monitor in real time how the metal/ceramic interface between the alloy NiAl and its oxide formed. The interfaces were synthesized by exposing the clean alloy to oxygen at either low or high temperature. During low-temperature exposure, an initially amorphous oxide formed. With annealing, this oxide crystallizes into one type of alumina that has two orientational domains. While the oxide is relatively uniform, it contained pinholes, which coarsened with annealing. In marked contrast, high-temperature exposure directly ... continued below

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22 p.

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McCarty, Kevin F. December 1, 2003.

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Description

We summarize the work of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 'Dynamics of Metal/Ceramic Interface Formation.' Low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) was used to monitor in real time how the metal/ceramic interface between the alloy NiAl and its oxide formed. The interfaces were synthesized by exposing the clean alloy to oxygen at either low or high temperature. During low-temperature exposure, an initially amorphous oxide formed. With annealing, this oxide crystallizes into one type of alumina that has two orientational domains. While the oxide is relatively uniform, it contained pinholes, which coarsened with annealing. In marked contrast, high-temperature exposure directly produced rod-shaped islands of crystalline oxide. These rods were all aligned along the substrate's [001] direction and could be many microns in length. Real-time observations showed that the rods can both grow and shrink by addition and subtraction, respectively, at their ends.

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22 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2003-8730
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/918253 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 918253
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc877767

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  • December 1, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

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  • Dec. 7, 2016, 10:53 a.m.

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McCarty, Kevin F. Dynamics of metal/ceramic interface formation., report, December 1, 2003; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc877767/: accessed August 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.