Comments on 'Pore-Scale Visulization of Colloid Transport andRetention in Partly Saturated Porous Media'

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The recent study by Crist et al. (2004) attempted to provide pore scale insights into mechanisms responsible for controlling colloid transport in unsaturated porous media. However, because they relied on images obtained along surfaces that were open to the atmosphere, artificial evaporation resulted in 2 more critical artifacts; formation of air-water-solid (AWS) contact lines, and advection/deposition of colloids to AWS contact lines. These evaporation-related artifacts need to be addressed because they account for most of the colloid deposition at AWS contact lines reported in Crist et al. (2004)...As stated in Crist el al. (2004), ''... the front panel was removed ... continued below

Creation Information

Wan, Jiamin & Tokunaga, Tetsu K. February 15, 2005.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

The recent study by Crist et al. (2004) attempted to provide pore scale insights into mechanisms responsible for controlling colloid transport in unsaturated porous media. However, because they relied on images obtained along surfaces that were open to the atmosphere, artificial evaporation resulted in 2 more critical artifacts; formation of air-water-solid (AWS) contact lines, and advection/deposition of colloids to AWS contact lines. These evaporation-related artifacts need to be addressed because they account for most of the colloid deposition at AWS contact lines reported in Crist et al. (2004)...As stated in Crist el al. (2004), ''... the front panel was removed to avoid light reflections that obscured the view and, thus, exposed one side of the sand column to air''. Although a more recent paper (Crist et al., 2005) also presents results using the same methods and is therefore also affected by evaporation, we will restrict our present comments to Crist et al. (2004). Here, we show that removal of the front panel results in a sequence of three critical artifacts; (1) significant evaporation, (2) drying of thin films and formation of air-water-solid (AWS) contact lines, and (3) advection of colloids to AWS contact lines where they are deposited. As explained below, these artifacts so drastically disturbed their system that the magnitude of their observations are not likely to occur anywhere except within the most superficial few cm of soils. Before explaining these artifacts, we note that although trapping of colloids at AWS contact lines reported in Crist et al. (2004) is largely an artifact of evaporation, colloid filtration within perimeters of pendular rings is in fact a main prediction of the film straining model (Wan and Tokunaga, 1997). In that model, colloid filtration is predicted to be more efficient below a critical water saturation, when capillary connections between pendular rings become separated by adsorbed water films. In that paper we stated that ''Retardation of ideal, nonsorbing colloids can occur at two locations: trapped within individual pendular rings due to exclusion from entry into surrounding thin films and within film...'' (Wan and Tokunaga, 1997). Thus, while Crist et al. (2004) implied that the film straining model applies only to retardation of colloid transport within thin films, colloid retention within perimeters of pendular rings is a main feature of our model.

Source

  • Journal Name: Vadose Zone; Journal Volume: 4; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2005

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: LBNL--57398
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 878696
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc877594

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • February 15, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Sept. 29, 2016, 7:43 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 2

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Wan, Jiamin & Tokunaga, Tetsu K. Comments on 'Pore-Scale Visulization of Colloid Transport andRetention in Partly Saturated Porous Media', article, February 15, 2005; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc877594/: accessed June 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.