Response of removable epoxy foam exposed to fire using an element death model.

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Response of removable epoxy foam (REF) to high heat fluxes is described using a decomposition chemistry model [1] in conjunction with a finite element heat conduction code [2] that supports chemical kinetics and dynamic radiation enclosures. The chemistry model [1] describes the temporal transformation of virgin foam into carbonaceous residue by considering breakdown of the foam polymer structure, desorption of gases not associated with the foam polymer, mass transport of decomposition products from the reaction site to the bulk gas, and phase equilibrium. The finite element foam response model considers the spatial behavior of the foam by using measured and ... continued below

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81 p.

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Hobbs, Michael L. September 1, 2004.

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Description

Response of removable epoxy foam (REF) to high heat fluxes is described using a decomposition chemistry model [1] in conjunction with a finite element heat conduction code [2] that supports chemical kinetics and dynamic radiation enclosures. The chemistry model [1] describes the temporal transformation of virgin foam into carbonaceous residue by considering breakdown of the foam polymer structure, desorption of gases not associated with the foam polymer, mass transport of decomposition products from the reaction site to the bulk gas, and phase equilibrium. The finite element foam response model considers the spatial behavior of the foam by using measured and predicted thermophysical properties in combination with the decomposition chemistry model. Foam elements are removed from the computational domain when the condensed mass fractions of the foam elements are close to zero. Element removal, referred to as element death, creates a space within the metal confinement causing radiation to be the dominant mode of heat transfer between the surface of the remaining foam elements and the interior walls of the confining metal skin. Predictions were compared to front locations extrapolated from radiographs of foam cylinders enclosed in metal containers that were heated with quartz lamps [3,4]. The effects of the maximum temperature of the metal container, density of the foam, the foam orientation, venting of the decomposition products, pressurization of the metal container, and the presence or absence of embedded components are discussed.

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81 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2004-4320
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/919126 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 919126
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc877577

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • September 1, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 22, 2016, 2:13 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 1, 2016, 4:31 p.m.

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Hobbs, Michael L. Response of removable epoxy foam exposed to fire using an element death model., report, September 1, 2004; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc877577/: accessed November 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.