Monitoring Volatile Organic Tank Waste Using Cermet Microsensors

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Description

Presently, very few inexpensive technologies exist in the marketplace that can determine the contents of tank waste or monitor the chemistry of tank constituents in near-real time. The research addressed this problem by developing and assessing ceramic-metallic based microsensors for determining the constituents of a liquid organic storage tank by examining the gases in the headspace of the tank. Overall, the WBO and YSZ sensors responded well to the chemicals in this study. Responses to various concentrations were distinguishable visually. This is a clear indication that pattern recognition tools will be effective in resolving the constituents and concentrations. In tests, ... continued below

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Edward G. Gatliff, Ph.D.; Laura R. Skubal, Ph.D. & Michael C. Vogt, Ph.D. March 13, 2006.

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Description

Presently, very few inexpensive technologies exist in the marketplace that can determine the contents of tank waste or monitor the chemistry of tank constituents in near-real time. The research addressed this problem by developing and assessing ceramic-metallic based microsensors for determining the constituents of a liquid organic storage tank by examining the gases in the headspace of the tank. Overall, the WBO and YSZ sensors responded well to the chemicals in this study. Responses to various concentrations were distinguishable visually. This is a clear indication that pattern recognition tools will be effective in resolving the constituents and concentrations. In tests, such as the test with acetophenone, one sensor, the WBO sensor is not extremely effective. However, the other sensor, the YSZ sensor, is effective in resolving the concentrations. This supports the need to use an array of sensors, as one sensor may be reactive to a compound while another may not. In the course of this research, several interesting phenomena surfaced. New sensors, that were fabricated but not used in a contaminant gas, seemed to function more effectively and predictably if a ?conditioning? step was imposed upon them prior to use in square wave voltammetry. A conditioning step consists of running cyclic voltammetry prior to running square wave voltammetry. This step tends to ?cleanse? the sensor surface by providing a full -1.0 V to +1.0V sweep and both oxidizing and reducing compounds on the sensor surface. [Note: squarewave voltammetry will simply oxidize or reduce compounds ? it will not induce both reactions.] This sweep is essential for recovery between samples.

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683kb

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  • Report No.: SBIR Phase I Report
  • Grant Number: FG02-04ER83901
  • DOI: 10.2172/877280 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 877280
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc877546

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  • March 13, 2006

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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Edward G. Gatliff, Ph.D.; Laura R. Skubal, Ph.D. & Michael C. Vogt, Ph.D. Monitoring Volatile Organic Tank Waste Using Cermet Microsensors, report, March 13, 2006; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc877546/: accessed August 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.