Do myoepithelial cells hold the key for breast tumorprogression?

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Mammary myoepithelial cells have been the foster child of breast cancer biology and have been largely ignored since they were considered to be less important for tumorigenesis than luminal epithelial cells from which most of breast carcinomas are thought to arise. In recent years as our knowledge in stem cell biology and the cellular microenvironment has been increasing myoepithelial cells are slowly starting to gain more attention. Emerging data raise the hypothesis if myoepithelial cells play a key role in breast tumor progression by regulating the in situ to invasive carcinoma transition and if myoepithelial cells are part of the ... continued below

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Polyak, Kornelia & Hu, Min November 18, 2005.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 11 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

Mammary myoepithelial cells have been the foster child of breast cancer biology and have been largely ignored since they were considered to be less important for tumorigenesis than luminal epithelial cells from which most of breast carcinomas are thought to arise. In recent years as our knowledge in stem cell biology and the cellular microenvironment has been increasing myoepithelial cells are slowly starting to gain more attention. Emerging data raise the hypothesis if myoepithelial cells play a key role in breast tumor progression by regulating the in situ to invasive carcinoma transition and if myoepithelial cells are part of the mammary stem cell niche. Paracrine interactions between myoepithelial and luminal epithelial cells are known to be important for cell cycle arrest, establishing epithelial cell polarity, and inhibiting migration and invasion. Based on these functions normal mammary myoepithelial cells have been called ''natural tumor suppressors''. However, during tumor progression myoepithelial cells seem to loose these properties and eventually they themselves diminish as tumors become invasive. Better understanding of myoepithelial cell function and their role in tumor progression may lead to their exploitation for cancer therapeutic and preventative measures.

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasis; Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 07/2005

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  • Report No.: LBNL--59752
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 889622
  • Grant Number: RSG-05-154-01-MGO
  • Grant Number: DAMD17-02-1-0692
  • Grant Number: W81XWH-04-1-0452
  • Grant Number: P50 CA89393-05
  • Grant Number: CA94074-03
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc876807

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • November 18, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Nov. 30, 2017, 7:24 p.m.

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Polyak, Kornelia & Hu, Min. Do myoepithelial cells hold the key for breast tumorprogression?, article, November 18, 2005; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc876807/: accessed December 15, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.