Survey and Alighment for the ALS Project at LBL Berkeley

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The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a synchrotron radiation source of the third generation designed to produce extremely bright photon beams in the UV and soft X-ray regions. Its main accelerator components are a 1-1.9 GeV electron storage ring with 196.8 m circumference and 12 super-periods, a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron with 75.0 m circumference and 4 super-periods, and a 50 MeV linac, as shown in Fig. 1. The storage ring has particularly tight positioning tolerances for lattice magnets and other components to assure the required operational characteristics. The general survey and alignment ... continued below

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14 pages

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Keller, R.; Lauritzen, T.; /LBL, Berkeley; Friedsam, H. & /SLAC August 12, 2005.

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Description

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a synchrotron radiation source of the third generation designed to produce extremely bright photon beams in the UV and soft X-ray regions. Its main accelerator components are a 1-1.9 GeV electron storage ring with 196.8 m circumference and 12 super-periods, a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron with 75.0 m circumference and 4 super-periods, and a 50 MeV linac, as shown in Fig. 1. The storage ring has particularly tight positioning tolerances for lattice magnets and other components to assure the required operational characteristics. The general survey and alignment concept for the ALS is based on a network of fixed monuments installed in the building floor, to which all component positions are referred. Measurements include electronic distance measurements and separate sightings for horizontal and vertical directions, partially with automated electronic data capture. Most of the data processing is accomplished by running a customized version of PC-GEONET. It provides raw data storage, data reduction, and the calculation of adjusted coordinates, as well as an option for error analysis. PC-GEONET has also been used to establish an observation plan for the monuments and calculate their expected position accuracies, based on approximate coordinates. Additionally, for local survey tasks, the commercial software package ECDS is used. In this paper, the ALS survey and alignment strategy and techniques are presented and critically discussed. First experiences with the alignment of the linac and booster components are described.

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14 pages

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  • Presented at 2nd International Workshop on Accelerator Alignment (IWAA 90), Hamburg, Germany, 10-12 Sep 1990

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  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB-11416
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 878792
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc876063

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • August 12, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Dec. 7, 2016, 10:46 p.m.

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Keller, R.; Lauritzen, T.; /LBL, Berkeley; Friedsam, H. & /SLAC. Survey and Alighment for the ALS Project at LBL Berkeley, article, August 12, 2005; [Menlo Park, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc876063/: accessed December 13, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.