Quadrupole Focusing Lenses for Charged Particles

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Description

A set of four strong focusing magnetic quadrupole lenses has been constructed and operated. Each lens consists of four air cooled electromagnets with pole tips having a hyperbolic cross section. Each lens is 4 in. long and has an aperture 2 in. in diameter. Measurements of the magnetic field demonstrate that the hyperbolic cross section satisfies the requirements of a constant magnetic field gradient very well. The technique of deflecting a current carrying flexible wire has been used to measure the trajectory of charged particles through the system of lenses. It has been observed that the strong focusing requirements are ... continued below

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Cork, Bruce & Zajec, Emery April 15, 1953.

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Description

A set of four strong focusing magnetic quadrupole lenses has been constructed and operated. Each lens consists of four air cooled electromagnets with pole tips having a hyperbolic cross section. Each lens is 4 in. long and has an aperture 2 in. in diameter. Measurements of the magnetic field demonstrate that the hyperbolic cross section satisfies the requirements of a constant magnetic field gradient very well. The technique of deflecting a current carrying flexible wire has been used to measure the trajectory of charged particles through the system of lenses. It has been observed that the strong focusing requirements are satisfied. The system of lenses was then used to focus 0.5 Mev protons, 20 Mev deuterons, and 40 Mev alpha particles. The parallel beam of 0.5 Mev protons was detected by observing the incandescence of a quartz plate while the protons were bombarding it. The focused beam was less than 1 mm in diameter. The astigmatic 20 Mev deuteron beam from the 60 in. cyclotron was increased in current density by a factor greater than 30.

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  • Report No.: UCRL--2182
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • DOI: 10.2172/878126 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 878126
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc875959

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Creation Date

  • April 15, 1953

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Nov. 3, 2016, 7:59 p.m.

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Cork, Bruce & Zajec, Emery. Quadrupole Focusing Lenses for Charged Particles, report, April 15, 1953; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc875959/: accessed August 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.