Critique Panel Comments on Reservoir Engineering DOE Geothermal Technology Development

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As our geothermal fields mature and the inevitable problems arise with their exploitation, it will be reservoir engineers that will evaluate our possible future courses of action in order to solve these problems. But first they must have the right tools and data. To date, the best reservoir engineering tool we have in geothermal is the reservoir simulators. The reason for this is our severe lack of definition of reservoir parameters. Within a simulation there are checks and balances on the interrelation of reservoir parameters that keep the result within certain realistic bounds. These uncertain parameters make most traditional reservoir ... continued below

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Kaspereit, Dennis March 24, 1992.

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As our geothermal fields mature and the inevitable problems arise with their exploitation, it will be reservoir engineers that will evaluate our possible future courses of action in order to solve these problems. But first they must have the right tools and data. To date, the best reservoir engineering tool we have in geothermal is the reservoir simulators. The reason for this is our severe lack of definition of reservoir parameters. Within a simulation there are checks and balances on the interrelation of reservoir parameters that keep the result within certain realistic bounds. These uncertain parameters make most traditional reservoir engineering methods such as volumetrics of little use for anything beyond preliminary work. Parametric studies such as those by Mike Shook help in determining the range and sensitivity of unconstrained variables in simulator work and are valuable. However, as two non-unique simulations can yield similar results on an established field configuration, the same two can then give different results if used for investigating different future scenarios, injection cases or other what-if's. Therefore to use simulators as a development or management tool with greater confidence, a more unique solution is desired, requiring greater definition of the parameters input into the model. By determining these parameters a greater assortment of reservoir engineering methods also becomes available. However, I do not see enough research directed to determining these parameters at this time, and there should be more. These parameters and other methods will be needed to use in the important slim hole evaluations being researched, as simulations are more for developed producing fields with some history, not exploration prospects. One of the best ways to get some of these parameters is by logging methods. The slim hole tools discussed by Peter Lysne on Tuesday afternoon will be needed to get these parameters in exploration prospects. Besides a natural gamma ray spectrometry tool I see a neutron tool as a first choice, and a resistivity tool as a second choice that will also be needed as a minimum logging suite. The research that is needed soon, rather than later, is what Peter was calling inversion technology, and what I would call the calibration of logging responses to geothermal reservoirs.

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  • Proceedings, Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market - The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market; San Francisco, CA, March 24-26, 1992, Geothermal Program Review X

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  • Report No.: CONF-920378--38
  • Grant Number: None
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 891974
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc874815

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • March 24, 1992

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Dec. 6, 2016, 8:01 p.m.

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Kaspereit, Dennis. Critique Panel Comments on Reservoir Engineering DOE Geothermal Technology Development, article, March 24, 1992; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc874815/: accessed October 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.