Mechanisms and consequences of paternally transmitted chromosomal abnormalities

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Paternally transmitted chromosomal damage has been associated with pregnancy loss, developmental and morphological defects, infant mortality, infertility, and genetic diseases in the offspring including cancer. There is epidemiological evidence linking paternal exposure to occupational or environmental agents with an increased risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also a large body of literature on germ cell mutagenesis in rodents showing that treatment of male germ cells with mutagens has dramatic consequences on reproduction producing effects such as those observed in human epidemiological studies. However, we know very little about the etiology, transmission and early embryonic consequences of paternally-derived chromosomal abnormalities. ... continued below

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Marchetti, F & Wyrobek, A J April 5, 2005.

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Paternally transmitted chromosomal damage has been associated with pregnancy loss, developmental and morphological defects, infant mortality, infertility, and genetic diseases in the offspring including cancer. There is epidemiological evidence linking paternal exposure to occupational or environmental agents with an increased risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also a large body of literature on germ cell mutagenesis in rodents showing that treatment of male germ cells with mutagens has dramatic consequences on reproduction producing effects such as those observed in human epidemiological studies. However, we know very little about the etiology, transmission and early embryonic consequences of paternally-derived chromosomal abnormalities. The available evidence suggests that: (1) there are distinct patterns of germ cell-stage differences in the sensitivity of induction of transmissible genetic damage with male postmeiotic cells being the most sensitive; (2) cytogenetic abnormalities at first metaphase after fertilization are critical intermediates between paternal exposure and abnormal reproductive outcomes; and, (3) there are maternally susceptibility factors that may have profound effects on the amount of sperm DNA damage that is converted into chromosomal aberrations in the zygote and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes.

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PDF-file: 52 pages; size: 1.3 Mbytes

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  • Journal Name: Birth Defects Research Part C: Embryo Today; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JRNL-211336
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 875371
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc874292

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • April 5, 2005

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Dec. 7, 2016, 5:37 p.m.

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Marchetti, F & Wyrobek, A J. Mechanisms and consequences of paternally transmitted chromosomal abnormalities, article, April 5, 2005; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc874292/: accessed December 15, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.