The Next Generation Photoinjector

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This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal ... continued below

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181 pages

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Palmer, Dennis Thomas & /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. September 12, 2005.

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Description

This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 {pi} mm mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes. The Cu QE was found to be 4.5 x 10{sup -5} with a 25% variation in the QE across the emitting surface of the cathode, while supporting a field gradient of 125 MV/m. At low charge, the transverse normalized rms emittance, {epsilon}{sub n,rms}, produced by the NGP is {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.2 {pi} mm mrad for Q{sub T} = 0.3 nC. The 95% electron beam bunch length was measured to 10.9 psec. The emittance due to the finite magnetic field at the cathode has been studied. The scaling of this magnetic emittance term as a function of cathode magnetic field was found to be 0.01 {pi} mm mrad per Gauss. The 1.6 cell rf gun has been designed to reduce the dipole field asymmetry of the longitudinal accelerating field. Low level rf measurements show that this has in fact been accomplished, with an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field. High power beam studies also show that the dipole field has been decreased. An upper limit of the intrinsic non-reducible thermal emittance of a photocathode under high field gradient was found to be {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 0.8 {pi} mm mrad. Agreement is found between the theoretical calculation of the thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub 0} = 0.62 {pi} mm mrad, and the experimental results, after taking into account all of the emittance contribution terms. The 1 nC emittance was found to be {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 4.75 {pi} mm mrad with a 95% electron beam bunch length of 14.7 psec. Systematic bunch length measurements showed electron beam bunch lengthening due the electron beam charge. They will show that the discrepancy between measurement and simulation is due to three effects. The major effect is due to the variation of the QE in the photo-emitting area of the Cu cathode. Also, space charge emittance blowup in the transport line will be shown to be a significant effect because the electron beam is still in the space charge dominated regime. The last effect, which has been observed experimentally, is the electron bunch lengthening as a function of total electron bunch charge.

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181 pages

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  • Report No.: SLAC-R-500
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • DOI: 10.2172/878424 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 878424
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc873888

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  • September 12, 2005

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Nov. 30, 2016, 12:57 p.m.

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Palmer, Dennis Thomas & /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. The Next Generation Photoinjector, report, September 12, 2005; [Menlo Park, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc873888/: accessed September 26, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.