Nitrate Biogeochemistry and Reactive Transport in California Groundwater: LDRD Final Report

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Nitrate is the number one drinking water contaminant in the United States. It is pervasive in surface and groundwater systems,and its principal anthropogenic sources have increased dramatically in the last 50 years. In California alone, one third of the public drinking-water wells has been lost since 1988 and nitrate contamination is the most common reason for abandonment. Effective nitrate management in groundwater is complicated by uncertainties related to multiple point and non-point sources, hydrogeologic complexity, geochemical reactivity, and quantification of denitrification processes. In this paper, we review an integrated experimental and simulation-based framework being developed to study the fate of ... continued below

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PDF-file: 209 pages; size: 13.8 Mbytes

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Esser, B K; Beller, H; Carle, S; Cey, B; Hudson, G B; Leif, R et al. February 24, 2006.

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Description

Nitrate is the number one drinking water contaminant in the United States. It is pervasive in surface and groundwater systems,and its principal anthropogenic sources have increased dramatically in the last 50 years. In California alone, one third of the public drinking-water wells has been lost since 1988 and nitrate contamination is the most common reason for abandonment. Effective nitrate management in groundwater is complicated by uncertainties related to multiple point and non-point sources, hydrogeologic complexity, geochemical reactivity, and quantification of denitrification processes. In this paper, we review an integrated experimental and simulation-based framework being developed to study the fate of nitrate in a 25 km-long groundwater subbasin south of San Jose, California, a historically agricultural area now undergoing rapid urbanization with increasing demands for groundwater. The modeling approach is driven by a need to integrate new and archival data that support the hypothesis that nitrate fate and transport at the basin scale is intricately related to hydrostratigraphic complexity, variability of flow paths and groundwater residence times, microbial activity, and multiple geochemical reaction mechanisms. This study synthesizes these disparate and multi-scale data into a three-dimensional and highly resolved reactive transport modeling framework.

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PDF-file: 209 pages; size: 13.8 Mbytes

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  • Report No.: UCRL-TR-219675
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/878204 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 878204
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc873814

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  • February 24, 2006

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Nov. 30, 2016, 1:05 p.m.

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Esser, B K; Beller, H; Carle, S; Cey, B; Hudson, G B; Leif, R et al. Nitrate Biogeochemistry and Reactive Transport in California Groundwater: LDRD Final Report, report, February 24, 2006; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc873814/: accessed August 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.