Underground Corrosion after 32 Years: A Study of Fate and Transport

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Improved estimates for corrosion rates in variably saturated porous media are required by the U.S. Department of Energy to maintain long-term storage of radioactive contaminants in stainless steel containers. To better define these parameters, research was undertaken to complete the National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) long-term study of buried stainless steel began 35 years ago. The 1970 study was initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as NIST, when over 1000 specimens--including stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434-configured as plates, U-bend, and tubes in both annealed and cold ... continued below

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Flitton, M. K. Adler June 1, 2006.

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Improved estimates for corrosion rates in variably saturated porous media are required by the U.S. Department of Energy to maintain long-term storage of radioactive contaminants in stainless steel containers. To better define these parameters, research was undertaken to complete the National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) long-term study of buried stainless steel began 35 years ago. The 1970 study was initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as NIST, when over 1000 specimens--including stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434-configured as plates, U-bend, and tubes in both annealed and cold worked conditions with various treatments--were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed with specimens retrieved after one, two, four, and eight years at each of the six sites. The fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 34 years.

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  • Report No.: EMSP-86808--2005
  • Grant Number: NONE
  • DOI: 10.2172/885077 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 885077
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc873478

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  • June 1, 2006

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Feb. 16, 2017, 6:19 p.m.

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Flitton, M. K. Adler. Underground Corrosion after 32 Years: A Study of Fate and Transport, report, June 1, 2006; Idaho Falls, Idaho. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc873478/: accessed August 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.