Tenascin-X, Collagen, Elastin and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

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Tenascin-X is an extracellular matrix protein initially identified because of its overlap with the human CYP21B gene. Because studies of gene and protein function of other tenascins had been poorly predictive of essential functions in vivo, we used a genetic approach that critically relied on an understanding of the genomic locus to uncover an association between inactivating tenascin-X mutations and novel recessive and dominant forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X provides the first example of a gene outside of the fibrillar collagens and their processing enzymes that causes Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X null mice recapitulate the skin findings of the human disease, ... continued below

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Bristow, James; Carey, William & Schalkwijk, Joost August 31, 2005.

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Tenascin-X is an extracellular matrix protein initially identified because of its overlap with the human CYP21B gene. Because studies of gene and protein function of other tenascins had been poorly predictive of essential functions in vivo, we used a genetic approach that critically relied on an understanding of the genomic locus to uncover an association between inactivating tenascin-X mutations and novel recessive and dominant forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X provides the first example of a gene outside of the fibrillar collagens and their processing enzymes that causes Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X null mice recapitulate the skin findings of the human disease, confirming a causative role for this gene in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further evaluation of these mice showed that tenascin-X is an important regulator of collagen deposition in vivo, suggesting a novel mechanism of disease in this form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further studies suggest that tenascin-X may do this through both direct and indirect interactions with the collagen fibril. Recent studies show that TNX effects on matrix extend beyond the collagen to the elastogenic pathway and matrix remodeling enzymes. Tenascin-X serves as a compelling example of how human experiments of nature can guide us to an understanding of genes whose function may not be evident from their sequence or in vitro studies of their encoded proteins.

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Medical Genetics; Journal Volume: 139; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 11/15/2005

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  • Report No.: LBNL--58738
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Grant Number: NIHU1HL66681B
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 889797
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc873227

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • August 31, 2005

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  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Sept. 21, 2017, 7:03 p.m.

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Bristow, James; Carey, William & Schalkwijk, Joost. Tenascin-X, Collagen, Elastin and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, article, August 31, 2005; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc873227/: accessed May 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.