Instrumentation development for real time brainwave monitoring.

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Description

The human brain functions through a chemically-induced biological process which operates in a manner similar to electrical systems. The signal resulting from this biochemical process can actually be monitored and read using tools and having patterns similar to those found in electrical and electronics engineering. The primary signature of this electrical activity is the ''brain wave'', which looks remarkably similar to the output of many electrical systems. Likewise, the device currently used in medical arenas to read brain electrical activity is the electroencephalogram (EEG) which is synonymous with a multi-channel oscilloscope reading. Brain wave readings and recordings for medical purposes ... continued below

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28 p.

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Anderson, Lawrence Frederick & Clough, Benjamin W. December 1, 2005.

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Description

The human brain functions through a chemically-induced biological process which operates in a manner similar to electrical systems. The signal resulting from this biochemical process can actually be monitored and read using tools and having patterns similar to those found in electrical and electronics engineering. The primary signature of this electrical activity is the ''brain wave'', which looks remarkably similar to the output of many electrical systems. Likewise, the device currently used in medical arenas to read brain electrical activity is the electroencephalogram (EEG) which is synonymous with a multi-channel oscilloscope reading. Brain wave readings and recordings for medical purposes are traditionally taken in clinical settings such as hospitals, laboratories or diagnostic clinics. The signal is captured via externally applied scalp electrodes using semi-viscous gel to reduce impedance. The signal will be in the 10 to 100 microvolt range. In other instances, where surgeons are attempting to isolate particular types of minute brain signals, the electrodes may actually be temporarily implanted in the brain during a preliminary procedure. The current configurations of equipment required for EEGs involve large recording instruments, many electrodes, wires, and large amounts of hard disk space devoted to storing large files of brain wave data which are then eventually analyzed for patterns of concern. Advances in sensors, signal processing, data storage and microelectronics over the last decade would seem to have paved the way for the realization of devices capable of ''real time'' external monitoring, and possible assessment, of brain activity. A myriad of applications for such a capability are likewise presenting themselves, including the ability to assess brain functioning, level of functioning and malfunctioning. Our plan is to develop the sensors, signal processing, and portable instrumentation package which could capture, analyze, and communicate information on brain activity which could be of use to the individual, medical personnel or in other potential arenas. To take this option one step further, one might foresee that the signal would be captured, analyzed, and communicated to a person or device and which would result an action or reaction by that person or device. It is envisioned that ultimately a system would include a sensor detection mechanism, transmitter, receiver, microprocessor and associated memory, and audio and/or visual alert system. If successful in prototyping, the device could be considered for eventual implementation in ASIC form or as a fully integrated CMOS microsystem.

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28 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2005-6317
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/883483 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 883483
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc873094

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  • December 1, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 21, 2016, 2:29 a.m.

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  • Dec. 7, 2016, 3:40 p.m.

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Anderson, Lawrence Frederick & Clough, Benjamin W. Instrumentation development for real time brainwave monitoring., report, December 1, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc873094/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.