Neutrino flow and gravitational collapse

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The discovery of neutral currents in neutrino interactions has made necessary the recalculation of the neutrino flow during stellar collapse. Neutral currents cause a coherent scattering cross section of complex nuclei proportional to the square of the atomic weight. This allows neutrinos to escape easily from the hot, dense center where only free baryons exist. The neutrinos then interact strongly in the outer region of high atomic weight and, under certain circumstances, produce a supernovae-like explosion in the outer reaches of the star, leaving a neutron star behind. For an explosion to occur, the scattering in the envelope of heavy ... continued below

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Pages: 36

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Wilson, J.R. August 18, 1975.

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The discovery of neutral currents in neutrino interactions has made necessary the recalculation of the neutrino flow during stellar collapse. Neutral currents cause a coherent scattering cross section of complex nuclei proportional to the square of the atomic weight. This allows neutrinos to escape easily from the hot, dense center where only free baryons exist. The neutrinos then interact strongly in the outer region of high atomic weight and, under certain circumstances, produce a supernovae-like explosion in the outer reaches of the star, leaving a neutron star behind. For an explosion to occur, the scattering in the envelope of heavy nuclei must be greater than the scattering of the free baryons in the core. In particular, with Friedman's interpretation of Weinberg's theory, the cross section ratio is insufficient to produce an explosion. Other theories state that suppressing the free baryon cross section does lead to an explosion. (auth)

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Pages: 36

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Dep. NTIS

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  • Meeting of physics and astrophysics of neutron stars and black holes, Varenna, Italy, 14 Jul 1975

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  • Report No.: UCRL--76947
  • Report No.: CONF-750744--2
  • Grant Number: None
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 4150824
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc872174

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  • August 18, 1975

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 16, 2016, 12:32 a.m.

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  • Oct. 18, 2016, 1:54 p.m.

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Wilson, J.R. Neutrino flow and gravitational collapse, article, August 18, 1975; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc872174/: accessed August 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.