GEOLOGIC STUDIES OF UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS RAINIER AND NEPTUNE. Final Report

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The approximate physical distribution and condition of displaced and ruptured rock materials in the Rainier and Neptune areas were established by geologic observation of structural and lithologic details, and stratigraphic correlations. The effects of the detonations were found to be related to the rock types considered from the standpoint of engineering materials as well as to their structural positioning. Gross displacements and fracturing are in apparent accord with Mohr theory of rupture stress orientation. Factual data find explanation on the fundamental basis of primary (blast) and secondary (gravity) induced principal stresses. The 90 plus or minus 20-ton Neptune explosion disaggregated ... continued below

Physical Description

Pages: 59

Creation Information

Thompson, T L & Misz, J B October 28, 1959.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

The approximate physical distribution and condition of displaced and ruptured rock materials in the Rainier and Neptune areas were established by geologic observation of structural and lithologic details, and stratigraphic correlations. The effects of the detonations were found to be related to the rock types considered from the standpoint of engineering materials as well as to their structural positioning. Gross displacements and fracturing are in apparent accord with Mohr theory of rupture stress orientation. Factual data find explanation on the fundamental basis of primary (blast) and secondary (gravity) induced principal stresses. The 90 plus or minus 20-ton Neptune explosion disaggregated and displaced rock materials to a radial distance which ranged between 45 and 100 feet from ground zero depending on the orientation of bedding plane weaknesses and proximity of the ground surface to the point of detonation. Primary fracturing extended from ground zero to a radial distance which ranged from 55 feet to an estimated 145 feet depending on the favorable distribution of geologic structural weaknesses. Neptune was found to exhibit primary (blast) and secondary (gravity) rupture features which are fundamentally the same as those found in thc Rainier area. The 1700-ton Rainier shot initiallyformed a fused- rock-lined cavity of an average 62 plus or minus 10foot radius below ground zero and an undetermined radius above ground zero Gross primary rock displacement and gain disaggregation took place to a radiul distance of from 80 to 130 feet from ground zero. Visible primary fracturing extended to a radial distance which ranges between 150 and 220 feet depending on the proximity of hard brittle rock (welded tuff) which, it is concluded, transmitted rupture stresses to a much greater distance than the "punky" granular tuff. Collapse of rock material into the initial cavity was favored by primary shear fractures, which developed prominently to a radius of 150 feet from ground zero. The collapsed rock defines a 100-foot-diameter cylindrical zone. This zone is presumed to extend for 388 feet upward from ground zero. A dome-shaped top is postulated on the basis of Mohr stress theory. It should be noted that, with the exception of drill hole G, there has been no drilling or underground working above the Raise'' Drift. Cavities, distributed around the perimeter of the cylinder, are attributed to variations in the coherence of the rock strata which were disrupted during collapse. The collapse block has remained essentially intact. This fact, coupled with the virtual absence of radioactive fission products above ground zero and nearly complete pulverization of the central collapse block, leads to the conclusion that underground nuclear explosions are applicable to mining by block-caving methods. Furthermore, material within the crushed zone should be mineable without the use of additional explosives. The mineability of material within the fracture limit is a question that is difficult to answer at present, as the degree of fracturing has not been established. Perhaps the direct approach of experimental excavation would be the best solution to the problem. The conclusions presented should be considered as hypotheses awaiting verification. There is still much to be learned from the Rainier explosion. (auth)

Physical Description

Pages: 59

Source

  • Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-60

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: UCRL-5757
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/4171913 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 4171913
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc869239

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • October 28, 1959

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 16, 2016, 12:32 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Feb. 16, 2017, 6:06 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 5

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Thompson, T L & Misz, J B. GEOLOGIC STUDIES OF UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS RAINIER AND NEPTUNE. Final Report, report, October 28, 1959; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc869239/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.