Colloidal Radioalbumin Aggregates for Organ Scanning

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Colloidal aggregates (10 to 20 m mu ) of human serum albumin /sup 131/I may be used safely by intravenous injection to perform photoscans of the heart, liver, spleen, stomach, and salivary glands in man. Large particle size suspensions (10 to 50 mu ) of the same material were investigated experimentally in animals for scanning the lungs after intravenous injection and the brain following injection into an internal carotid artery. The advantages of this test material are the relatively low radiation exposure to the target organs and the number of organs that may be examined. Radiation exposure is low because ... continued below

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9 p.

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Taplin, G. V.; Dore, E. K.; Johnson, D. E. & Kaplan, H. January 1, 1963.

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Description

Colloidal aggregates (10 to 20 m mu ) of human serum albumin /sup 131/I may be used safely by intravenous injection to perform photoscans of the heart, liver, spleen, stomach, and salivary glands in man. Large particle size suspensions (10 to 50 mu ) of the same material were investigated experimentally in animals for scanning the lungs after intravenous injection and the brain following injection into an internal carotid artery. The advantages of this test material are the relatively low radiation exposure to the target organs and the number of organs that may be examined. Radiation exposure is low because of the rapid turnover in the target organs and removal from the body, mainly by urinary excretion, within 72 hr. The mechanism of liverspleen localization with this organic colloid is the same as for inorganic colloidal /sup 198/Au, namely, rapid removal from the blood by the phagocytic cells of the liver and spleen. However, in contrast to the inorganic colloid, which remains in the phagocytic cells permanently, albumin is digested by proteolytic enzymes and the /sup 131/I label is set free to re-enter the general circulation. With the thyroid blocked, the / sup 131/ is excreted mainly in the urine as free iodide together with other labeled albumin degradation products, such as tyrosine and peptides. The calculated radiation dose to the liver is at least 100 times less from colloidal albumin Jail than from an equal dose of /sup 198/Au. (auth)

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9 p.

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  • 10th Annual Meeting, Nuclear Medicine Society, Montreal, Canada, June 26-29, 1963

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  • Report No.: CONF-164-11
  • Grant Number: AT-04-1-GEN-12
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 4032591
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc866604

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • January 1, 1963

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  • Sept. 16, 2016, 12:32 a.m.

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  • Oct. 11, 2017, 3:13 p.m.

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Taplin, G. V.; Dore, E. K.; Johnson, D. E. & Kaplan, H. Colloidal Radioalbumin Aggregates for Organ Scanning, article, January 1, 1963; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc866604/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.