Do Anger Expressions, Coping Strategies and Interpersonal Support Dynamics Relate to CD4 Count in HIV-Positive Adults?

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Paper on whether anger expressions, coping strategies and interpersonal support dynamics relate to CD4 count in HIV positive adults.

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36 p.

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Pierson, Mark & Vosvick, Mark A. April 19, 2012.

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  • Main Title: Do Anger Expressions, Coping Strategies and Interpersonal Support Dynamics Relate to CD4 Count in HIV-Positive Adults?
  • Series Title: University Scholars Day

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Description

Paper on whether anger expressions, coping strategies and interpersonal support dynamics relate to CD4 count in HIV positive adults.

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36 p.

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Abstract: The expression of anger is associated with positive health outcomes (Iyer, Korin, Higginbotham & Davidson, 2010). Healthy immune function is salient for people living with HIV (PLH) and has been studied vigorously over the past few decades (Weeks & Alcamo, 2010). Suppression of anger has been known to lead to negative mental health outcomes for PLH (Daniel, Goldston, Erkanle, Franklin & Mayfield, 2009); therefore, finding alternative ways to express anger is critical for mental health professionals working with PLH. The aim of this investigation is to examine the relationships between expression of anger, active coping, social support and CD4 count, hypothesizing that expression of anger, active coping and social support contribute to the health of PLH, specifically via a physiological marker. The best predictor of immune function decline for this population is CD4 T-helper cell count (Kelly, 1992); as CD4 count decreases, disease symptoms increase. Social support, however, is related to decreased distress (Blaney, Goodkin, Feaster, Morgan, Millon, Szapocznik & Eisdorfer, 1997) and less self-reported HIV-related health symptoms over time (Ashton et al., 2005). Active coping is a commonly accepted method to ameliorate negative consequences of anger (Lohr, Olatunji, Baumeister & Bushman, 2007) possibly via a tangible social support system. For the authors' analyses, the authors measured anger with the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI; Spielberger, 1983). Active coping was measured using Brief Cope (Carver, 1997) and tangible social support was measured using the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL; Cohen, Mermelstein, Kamarck & Hoberman, 1985). Lastly, CD4 count was self-reported from the participants' most recent medical assessment. Our gender balanced sample (n = 63) included HIV-positive adults from the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Our sample was diverse, however, a notable proportion of our sample was African American (69%) with a mean age of 47 (SD = 8.87). After controlling for age, gender, and time since last CD4 assessment; state anger expression, active coping and tangible social support account for 33% of the variance in CD4 cell count (Adj. R2=.33, F(6,57), p<.001). Our findings suggest that anger expression within tangible support systems promotes improved health in PLH.

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  • Ninth Annual University Scholars Day, 2012, Denton, Texas, United States

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  • Do Anger Expressions, Coping Strategies and Interpersonal Support Dynamics Relate to CD4 Count in HIV-Positive Adults? [Presentation], ark:/67531/metadc93273

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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Do Anger Expressions, Coping Strategies and Interpersonal Support Dynamics Relate to CD4 Count in HIV-Positive Adults? [Presentation] (Presentation)

Do Anger Expressions, Coping Strategies and Interpersonal Support Dynamics Relate to CD4 Count in HIV-Positive Adults? [Presentation]

Presentation for the 2012 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas discussing anger expressions, coping strategies, and interpersonal support dynamics relating to CD4 count in human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV+) adults.

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Do Anger Expressions, Coping Strategies and Interpersonal Support Dynamics Relate to CD4 Count in HIV-Positive Adults? [Presentation], ark:/67531/metadc93273

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  • April 19, 2012

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 8, 2012, 10:10 a.m.

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  • Nov. 21, 2017, 8:46 p.m.

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Pierson, Mark & Vosvick, Mark A. Do Anger Expressions, Coping Strategies and Interpersonal Support Dynamics Relate to CD4 Count in HIV-Positive Adults?, paper, April 19, 2012; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86180/: accessed December 12, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Honors College.