Eaten: A Novel

Use of this thesis is restricted to the UNT Community. Off-campus users must log in to read.

Description

This novel operates on two levels. First, it is a story concerning the fate of a young woman named Raven Adams, who is prompted into journeying westward after witnessing what she believes to be an omen. On another level, however, the novel is intended to be a philosophical questioning of western modes of “science-based” singular conceptualizations of reality, which argue that there is only one “real world” and anyone who deviates from this is “crazy,” “stupid,” or “wrong.” Raven as a character sees the world in terms of what might be called “magical thinking” in modern psychology; her closest relationship ... continued below

Creation Information

Foster, Natalie May 2016.

Context

This thesis is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 87 times , with 8 in the last month . More information about this thesis can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this thesis or its content.

Publisher

Rights Holder

For guidance see Citations, Rights, Re-Use.

  • Foster, Natalie

Provided By

UNT Libraries

The UNT Libraries serve the university and community by providing access to physical and online collections, fostering information literacy, supporting academic research, and much, much more.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this thesis. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

This novel operates on two levels. First, it is a story concerning the fate of a young woman named Raven Adams, who is prompted into journeying westward after witnessing what she believes to be an omen. On another level, however, the novel is intended to be a philosophical questioning of western modes of “science-based” singular conceptualizations of reality, which argue that there is only one “real world” and anyone who deviates from this is “crazy,” “stupid,” or “wrong.” Raven as a character sees the world in terms of what might be called “magical thinking” in modern psychology; her closest relationship is with a living embodiment of a story, the ancient philosopher Diogenes, which she believes is capable of possessing others and directing her journey. As the story continues the reader comes to understand Raven’s perceptions of her reality, leading to a conceptualization of reality as being “multi-layered.” Eventually these layers are collapsed and unified in the final chapters. The novel makes use of many reference points including philosophy, classical mythology, folklore, religion, and internet social media in order to guide the reader along Raven’s story.

Subjects

Language

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this thesis in the Digital Library or other systems.

Collections

This thesis is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Theses and Dissertations

Theses and dissertations represent a wealth of scholarly and artistic content created by masters and doctoral students in the degree-seeking process. Some ETDs in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

What responsibilities do I have when using this thesis?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this thesis.

Creation Date

  • May 2016

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 28, 2016, 4:28 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • May 22, 2017, 9:05 a.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this thesis last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 8
Total Uses: 87

Interact With This Thesis

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Foster, Natalie. Eaten: A Novel, thesis, May 2016; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc849746/: accessed October 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .