Community-based Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Developing, Testing and Validating Conceptual Models

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The field of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) suggests that transactions, collaboration, and value are important in the supply and delivery of products and services to meet the need of impoverished end-consumers. In many cases, the application of LSCM is paramount in most strategic decision-making efforts. Therefore, this research explores the applications of LSCM processes and activities within the community-based context. The methodology used to address the research questions consisted of a hybrid of mixed methods. This mixed methodology provides three essays that investigate the application and development of LSCM in the community-based context. The essays address the flow ... continued below

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Obaze, Yolanda May 2016.

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  • Obaze, Yolanda

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Description

The field of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) suggests that transactions, collaboration, and value are important in the supply and delivery of products and services to meet the need of impoverished end-consumers. In many cases, the application of LSCM is paramount in most strategic decision-making efforts. Therefore, this research explores the applications of LSCM processes and activities within the community-based context. The methodology used to address the research questions consisted of a hybrid of mixed methods. This mixed methodology provides three essays that investigate the application and development of LSCM in the community-based context. The essays address the flow of charitable products and services through supply chains. The dissertation does not pay close attention to the first-tier suppliers’ suppliers, which is looking at the originating flow of goods and services (raw materials, manufacturing, etc.). However, the dissertation puts a focus on products and services supplied to focal organizations and how these products are then passed on to end-consumers. Essay I looks at the transaction (costs) that ensue from the supply of charitable products. Essay II analyzes a social service ecosystem and investigates how the network of organizations enable the distribution of charitable products and services. Lastly, Essay III examines the delivery of valuable services to the end-consumers, and what tools Community-Based Enterprises (CBEs) should focus on to develop and retain end-consumers in impoverished communities. The research provides conceptual models that review some fundamental LSCM achievement gaps in supplying, delivering and providing social services to end users within impoverished communities. The dissertation draws upon literature from the fields of economics, marketing, social science, and logistics and supply chain management. The dissertation uses the primary research method of unstructured and semi-structured interviews, case studies, written survey instruments and system dynamics within three studies. The studies resolve to look into the term Community-Based Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CBLSCM) as employed by social service providers in the logistics and supply chain context and investigate how it applies to impoverished communities. The research identifies conceptual models that can be used to explain the role of LSCM within humanitarian aid context. The models offer insights on the managerial implications and evidence of using LSCM processes and techniques within impoverished communities. The research has considered that the type of transactional relationships, structure, shared value, service systems, and consumer value, retention and management mechanisms can be achieved utilizing LSCM.

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  • May 2016

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 28, 2016, 4:28 p.m.

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  • July 25, 2016, 12:42 p.m.

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Obaze, Yolanda. Community-based Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Developing, Testing and Validating Conceptual Models, dissertation, May 2016; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc849676/: accessed September 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .