Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

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Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in ... continued below

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Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W. & Puxbaum, H. December 11, 2009.

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Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to adversely affect human health (Lighty et al., 2000; Pope and Dockery, 2006). Gan et al. (Gan et al., accepted) examined the indoor air quality aboard submarines and found that the diesel particulate matter concentrations exceeded the EPA 24 hour standard. Claeys et al. (Claeys et al., accepted) studied the importance and sources of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in remote marine environment during a period of high biological activity. Methanesulphonate was the major SOA compound detected and there was no evidence for SOA from isoprene. The optical properties of gasoline and diesel vehicle particulate emissions and their relative contribution to radiative forcing was studied by Strawa et al. (Strawa et al., accepted).

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Aerosol Science

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  • Report No.: LBNL-4303E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1007491
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc847095

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  • December 11, 2009

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  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • July 5, 2016, 1:44 p.m.

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Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W. & Puxbaum, H. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere, article, December 11, 2009; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc847095/: accessed November 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.