Final Report for the project titled "Enabling Supernova Computations by Integrated Transport and Provisioning Methods Optimized for Dedicated Channels"

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A high-speed optical circuit network is one that offers users rate-guaranteed connectivity between two endpoints, unlike today’s IP-routed Internet in which the rate available to a pair of users fluctuates based on the volume of competing traffic. This particular research project advanced our understanding of circuit networks in two ways. First, transport protocols were developed for circuit networks. In a circuit network, since bandwidth resources are reserved for each circuit on an end-to-end basis (much like how a person reserves a seat on every leg of a multi-segment flight), and the sender is limited to send at the rate of ... continued below

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Veeraraghavan, Malathi October 31, 2007.

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Description

A high-speed optical circuit network is one that offers users rate-guaranteed connectivity between two endpoints, unlike today’s IP-routed Internet in which the rate available to a pair of users fluctuates based on the volume of competing traffic. This particular research project advanced our understanding of circuit networks in two ways. First, transport protocols were developed for circuit networks. In a circuit network, since bandwidth resources are reserved for each circuit on an end-to-end basis (much like how a person reserves a seat on every leg of a multi-segment flight), and the sender is limited to send at the rate of the circuit, there is no possibility of congestion during data transfer. Therefore, no congestion control functions are necessary in a transport protocol designed for circuits. However, error control and flow control are still required because bits can become errored due to noise and interference even on highly reliable optical links, and receivers can, due to multitasking or other reasons, not deplete the receive buffer fast enough to keep up with the sending rate (e.g., if the receiving host is multitasking between receiving a file transfer and some other computation). In this work, we developed two transport protocols for circuits, both of which are described below. Second, this project developed techniques for internetworking different types of connection-oriented networks, which are of two types: circuit-switched or packet-switched. In circuit-switched networks, multiplexing on links is “position based,” where “position” refers to the frequency, time slot, and port (fiber), while connection-oriented packet-switched networks use packet header information to demultiplex packets and switch them from node to node. The latter are commonly referred to as virtual circuit networks. Examples of circuit networks are time-division multiplexed Synchronous Optical Network/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SONET/SDH) and Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) networks, while examples of virtual-circuit networks are MultiProtocol Label Switched (MPLS) networks and Ethernet Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) networks. A series of new technologies have been developed to carry Ethernet VLAN tagged frames on SONET/SDH and WDM networks, such as Generic Framing Procedure (GFP) and ITU G.709, respectively. These technologies form the basis of our solution for connection-oriented internetworking. The benefit of developing such an architecture is that it allows different providers to choose different connection-oriented networking technologies for their networks, and yet be able to allow their customers to connect to those of other providers. As Metcalfe, the inventor of Ethernet, noted, the value of a network service grows exponentially with the number of endpoints to which any single endpoint can connect. Therefore internetworking solutions are key to commercial success. The technical effectiveness of our solutions was measured with proof-of-concept prototypes and experiments. These solutions were shown to be highly effective. Economic feasibility requires business case analyses that were beyond the scope of this project. The project results are beneficial to the public as they demonstrate the viability of simultaneously supporting different types of networks and data communication services much like the variety of services available for the transportation of people and goods. For example, Fedex service offers a deadline based delivery while the USPS offers basic package delivery service. Similarly, a circuit network can offer a deadline based delivery of a data file while the IP-routed network offers only basic delivery service with no guarantees. Two project Web sites, 13 publications, 7 software programs, 21 presentations resulted from this work. This report provides the complete list of publications, software programs and presentations. As for student education and training (human resources), this DOE project, along with an NSF project, jointly supported two postdoctoral fellowships, three PhDs, three Masters, and two undergraduate students. Specifically, two of the Masters students were directly funded on this DOE project.

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  • Report No.: Final Report
  • Grant Number: FG02-04ER25640
  • DOI: 10.2172/1014741 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1014741
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc846953

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Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • October 31, 2007

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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Veeraraghavan, Malathi. Final Report for the project titled "Enabling Supernova Computations by Integrated Transport and Provisioning Methods Optimized for Dedicated Channels", report, October 31, 2007; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc846953/: accessed December 11, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.