The Future of Hadrons: The Nexus of Subatomic Physics

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The author offers brief observations on matters discussed at the XIV International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy and explore prospects for hadron physics. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has been validated as a new law of nature. It is internally consistent up to very high energies, and so could be a complete theory of the strong interactions. Whether QCD is the final answer for the strong interactions is a subject for continuing experimental tests, which are being extended in experimentation at the Large Hadron Collider. Beyond the comparison of perturbative calculations with experiment, it remains critically important to test the confinement hypothesis by ... continued below

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14 pages

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Quigg, Chris September 1, 2011.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 12 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

The author offers brief observations on matters discussed at the XIV International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy and explore prospects for hadron physics. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has been validated as a new law of nature. It is internally consistent up to very high energies, and so could be a complete theory of the strong interactions. Whether QCD is the final answer for the strong interactions is a subject for continuing experimental tests, which are being extended in experimentation at the Large Hadron Collider. Beyond the comparison of perturbative calculations with experiment, it remains critically important to test the confinement hypothesis by searching for free quarks, or for signatures of unconfined color. Sensitive negative searches for quarks continue to be interesting, and the definitive observation of free quarks would be revolutionary. Breakdowns of factorization would compromise the utility of perturbative QCD. Other discoveries that would require small or large revisions to QCD include the observation of new kinds of colored matter beyond quarks and gluons, the discovery that quarks are composite, or evidence that SU(3){sub c} gauge symmetry is the vestige of a larger, spontaneously broken, color symmetry. While probing our underlying theory for weakness or new openings, we have plenty to do to apply QCD to myriad experimental settings, to learn its implications for matter under unusual conditions, and to become more adept at calculating its consequences. New experimental tools provide the means for progress on a very broad front.

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14 pages

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  • Prepared for: 14th International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy. Munich, Germany, 13-17 Jun 2011.

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-CONF-11-492-T
  • Grant Number: AC02-07CH11359
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1027521
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc846056

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • September 1, 2011

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  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • June 10, 2016, 8:48 p.m.

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Quigg, Chris. The Future of Hadrons: The Nexus of Subatomic Physics, article, September 1, 2011; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc846056/: accessed December 15, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.