Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

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Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all ... continued below

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Smith, Mr. Christopher B. & Ajayi, Dr. Oyelayo January 31, 2012.

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Description

Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant tribological material, FSP can replace the current conventional surface hardening techniques used for friction and wear performance. Friction Stir Link Inc. (FSL) is teamed with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop and optimize FSP for friction and wear performance enhancement. The ultimate goal is to offer FSP and an effective alternative to some of the current energy intensive and high-cost surface hardening processes.

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  • Report No.: Final Report
  • Grant Number: EE0003465
  • DOI: 10.2172/1033593 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1033593
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc845182

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  • January 31, 2012

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • Nov. 28, 2016, 6:06 p.m.

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Smith, Mr. Christopher B. & Ajayi, Dr. Oyelayo. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing, report, January 31, 2012; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc845182/: accessed August 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.