Final Technical Report - DE-EE0003542

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Wind has provided energy for thousands of years: some of the earliest windmill engineering designs date back to ancient Babylonia and India where wind would be used as a source of irrigation. Today, wind is the quickest growing resource in Americas expanding energy infrastructure. However, to continue to positively diversify Americas energy portfolio and further reduce the countrys reliance of foreign oil, the industry must grow substantially over the next two decades in both turbine installations and skilled industrial manpower to support. The wind sector is still an emergent industry requiring maturation and development of its labor force: dedicated training ... continued below

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39 Pages; 4.3MB

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Haley, James D March 31, 2013.

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Description

Wind has provided energy for thousands of years: some of the earliest windmill engineering designs date back to ancient Babylonia and India where wind would be used as a source of irrigation. Today, wind is the quickest growing resource in Americas expanding energy infrastructure. However, to continue to positively diversify Americas energy portfolio and further reduce the countrys reliance of foreign oil, the industry must grow substantially over the next two decades in both turbine installations and skilled industrial manpower to support. The wind sector is still an emergent industry requiring maturation and development of its labor force: dedicated training is needed to provide the hard and soft skills to support the increasingly complex wind turbine generators as the technology evolves. Furthermore, the American workforce is facing a steep decline in available labor resources as the baby boomer generation enters retirement age. It is therefore vital that a process is quickly created for supporting the next generation of wind technicians. However, the manpower growth must incorporate three key components. First, the safety and technical training curriculum must be standardized across the industry - current wind educational programs are disparate and dedicated standardization programs must be further refined and implemented. Second, it is essential that the wind sector avoid disrupting other energy production industries by cannibalizing workers, which would indirectly affect the rest of Americas energy portfolio. The future wind workforce must be created organically utilizing either young people entering the workforce or train personnel emerging from careers outside of energy production. Third, the training must be quick and efficient as large amounts of wind turbines are being erected each year and this growth is expected to continue until at least 2035. One source that matches these three requirements is personnel transitioning from military service to the civilian sector. Utilizing the labor pool of transitioning military personnel and a dedicated training program specifically tailored to military hard and soft skills, the wind workforce can rapidly expand with highly skilled personnel. A tailored training program also provides career opportunities to an underutilized labor force as the personnel return from active military duty. This projects goal was to create a Wind Workforce Development Program that streamlines the wind technician training process using industry-leading safety programs and building on existing military experience. The approach used was to gather data from the wind industry, develop the curriculum and test the process to ensure it provides adequate training to equip the technicians as they transition from the military into wind. The platform for the curriculum development is called Personal Qualification Standards (PQS), which is based on the program of the same name from the United States Navy. Not only would the program provide multiple delivery methods of training (including classroom, computer-based training and on-the-job training), but it also is a familiar style of training to many military men and women. By incorporating a familiar method of training, it encourages active participation in the training and reduces the time for personnel to grasp the concept and flow of the training requirements. The program was tested for thoroughness, schedule and efficacy using a 5-person pilot phase during the last two years. The results of the training were a reduction in time to complete training and increased customer satisfaction on client project sites. However, there were obstacles that surfaced and required adaptation throughout the project including method of delivery, curriculum development and project schedules and are discussed in detail throughout the report. There are several key recommendations in the report that discuss additional training infrastructure, scalability within additional alternative energy markets and organizational certification through standardization committees.

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39 Pages; 4.3MB

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  • Report No.: DOE/0003542
  • Grant Number: EE0003542
  • DOI: 10.2172/1072066 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1072066
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc843876

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • March 31, 2013

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 9:45 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • July 22, 2016, 7:34 p.m.

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Haley, James D. Final Technical Report - DE-EE0003542, report, March 31, 2013; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc843876/: accessed May 27, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.