Your World Magazine - Microbes: Parts and Potential

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Microorganisms are tiny, but together, they make up more than 60 percent of the earth's living matter. Often people think only of bacteria when they talk about microbes, but viruses, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae are also microbes. Scientists estimate that there are 2 to 3 billion species of microorganisms. By learning what genes microbes contain and how they are arranged, what they do, and how they are expressed, researchers get a better grasp on how microbes have evolved, new possibilities for diagnosing and treating diseases, and ideas for ways to clean up the environment and produce energy. You can be ... continued below

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Institute, Biotechnology April 1, 2005.

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This text is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 26 times . More information about this text can be viewed below.

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Microorganisms are tiny, but together, they make up more than 60 percent of the earth's living matter. Often people think only of bacteria when they talk about microbes, but viruses, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae are also microbes. Scientists estimate that there are 2 to 3 billion species of microorganisms. By learning what genes microbes contain and how they are arranged, what they do, and how they are expressed, researchers get a better grasp on how microbes have evolved, new possibilities for diagnosing and treating diseases, and ideas for ways to clean up the environment and produce energy. You can be a part of this exciting work in many ways. Figuring out the genes in microbes, or microbial genomics, is a field that gets a lot of help from computer science and mathematics. You could go into bioinformatics, which uses computers to collect and sort information about living matter. Or you could try computational modeling and help develop simple models of what an organism would look like and how it would function. Researchers want to understand microbes genetics well enough to build useful ones. As we move toward that possibility, we need to think about how that ability can be used wisely or poorly. Enjoy learning about microbial genomics in this issue of Your World, and think about what part you'd like to take in exploring this vital field. Some current uses of microbes are: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) - produces the CO{sub 2} that makes bread rise and is also used to make beer; (2) Streptomyces - soil bacteria that make streptomycin, an antibiotic, used to treat infections; (3) Pseudomonas putida - one of many microbes used to clean wastes from sewage at water treatment plants; (4) Escherichia coli - one of many kinds of microbes that live in your gut and help digest your food; and (5) Bacillus thuringiensis - a common soil bacterium that acts as a natural pest-killer in gardens and on crops.

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  • Report No.: DOE1- Final Report
  • Grant Number: FG02-05ER64080
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1049045
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc841817

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • April 1, 2005

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  • May 19, 2016, 9:45 a.m.

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  • Dec. 2, 2016, 6:48 p.m.

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Institute, Biotechnology. Your World Magazine - Microbes: Parts and Potential, text, April 1, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc841817/: accessed July 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.