Nanoparticle-assisted microwave absorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes

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This article discusses nanoparticle-assisted microwave absorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes.

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3 p.

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Wadhawan, Atul; Garrett, David & Pérez, José M. September 29, 2003.

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This article discusses nanoparticle-assisted microwave absorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes.

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3 p.

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Copyright 2003 American Institute of Physics. Applied Physics Letters, 83:13, http://apl.aip.org/resource/1/applab/v83/i13/p2683_s1

Abstract: We report the effects of microwave irradiation on both unpurified and purified iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation (HiPco)-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in ultrahigh vacuum. Under microwave irradiation, we observe that unpurified HiPco SWNTs quickly reach temperatures of approximately 1850 ºC. As a result, H2, H2O, CO, CO2, and CH4 gases are observed, and the Fe catalyst nanoparticles melt and coalesce into larger crystallites approximately four times their original diameter. In contrast, carbon black and purified HiPco SWNTs heat up to temperatures of 500-650 ºC. We propose that the significant heating of unpurified HiPco SWNTs is due to the Fe catalysts.

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  • Applied Physics Letters, 2003, College Park: American Institute of Physics, pp. 2683-2685

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  • Publication Title: Applied Physics Letters
  • Volume: 83
  • Issue: 13
  • Page Start: 2683
  • Page End: 2685
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • September 29, 2003

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  • May 4, 2012, 10:15 a.m.

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  • April 2, 2014, 4:12 p.m.

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Wadhawan, Atul; Garrett, David & Pérez, José M. Nanoparticle-assisted microwave absorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes, article, September 29, 2003; [College Park, Maryland]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84153/: accessed December 14, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.