Cosmic Ray Anomalies from the MSSM?

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The recent positron excess in cosmic rays (CR) observed by the PAMELA satellite may be a signal for dark matter (DM) annihilation. When these measurements are combined with those from FERMI on the total (e{sup +} + e{sup -}) ux and from PAMELA itself on the {anti p}p ratio, these and other results are difficult to reconcile with traditional models of DM, including the conventional minimal Supergravity (mSUGRA) version of Supersymmetry even if boosts as large as 10{sup 3-4} are allowed. In this paper, we combine the results of a previously obtained scan over a more general 19-parameter subspace of ... continued below

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57 pages

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Cotta, R.C.; /SLAC; Conley, J.A.; U., /Bonn; Gainer, J.S.; U., /Argonne /Northwestern et al. August 11, 2011.

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The recent positron excess in cosmic rays (CR) observed by the PAMELA satellite may be a signal for dark matter (DM) annihilation. When these measurements are combined with those from FERMI on the total (e{sup +} + e{sup -}) ux and from PAMELA itself on the {anti p}p ratio, these and other results are difficult to reconcile with traditional models of DM, including the conventional minimal Supergravity (mSUGRA) version of Supersymmetry even if boosts as large as 10{sup 3-4} are allowed. In this paper, we combine the results of a previously obtained scan over a more general 19-parameter subspace of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with a corresponding scan over astrophysical parameters that describe the propagation of CR. We then ascertain whether or not a good fit to this CR data can be obtained with relatively small boost factors while simultaneously satisfying the additional constraints arising from gamma ray data. We find that a specific subclass of MSSM models where the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) is mostly pure bino and annihilates almost exclusively into {tau} pairs comes very close to satisfying these requirements. The lightest in this set of models is found to be relatively close in mass to the LSP and is in some cases the nLSP. These models lead to a significant improvement in the overall fit to the data by {approx}1 unit of {chi}{sup 2}/dof in comparison to the best fit without Supersymmetry while employing boosts in the range {approx}100-200. The implications of these models for future experiments are discussed.

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57 pages

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  • Journal Name: JHEP 1101:064,2011; Journal Volume: 2011; Journal Issue: 1

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  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB-14211
  • Grant Number: AC02-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1023773
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc840462

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  • August 11, 2011

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • Nov. 23, 2016, 11:50 a.m.

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Cotta, R.C.; /SLAC; Conley, J.A.; U., /Bonn; Gainer, J.S.; U., /Argonne /Northwestern et al. Cosmic Ray Anomalies from the MSSM?, article, August 11, 2011; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc840462/: accessed November 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.