Probing the eV-Mass Range for Solar Axions with CAST

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The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for solar axions which could be produced in the core of the Sun via the so-called Primakoff effect. Not only would these hypothetical particles solve the strong CP problem, but they are also one of the favored candidates for dark matter. In order to look for axions originating from the Sun, CAST uses a decommissioned LHC prototype magnet. In its 10 m long magnetic field region of 9 Tesla, axions could be reconverted into X-ray photons. Different X-ray detectors are installed on both ends of the magnet, which is mounted on a ... continued below

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7 p. (0.3 MB)

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Vogel, J K; Pivovaroff, M J; Soufli, R; van Bibber, K & CAST, C November 11, 2010.

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The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for solar axions which could be produced in the core of the Sun via the so-called Primakoff effect. Not only would these hypothetical particles solve the strong CP problem, but they are also one of the favored candidates for dark matter. In order to look for axions originating from the Sun, CAST uses a decommissioned LHC prototype magnet. In its 10 m long magnetic field region of 9 Tesla, axions could be reconverted into X-ray photons. Different X-ray detectors are installed on both ends of the magnet, which is mounted on a structure built to follow the Sun during sunrise and sunset for a total of about 3 hours per day. The analysis of the data acquired during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnetic field region yielded the most restrictive experimental upper limit on the axion-to-photon coupling constant for axion masses up to about 0.02 eV. In order to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to a wider mass range, the CAST experiment continues its search for axions with helium in the magnet bores. In this way it is possible to restore coherence of conversion for larger masses. Changing the pressure of the helium gas enables the experiment to scan different axion masses in the range of up to about 1.2 eV. Especially at high pressures, a precise knowledge of the gas density distribution is crucial to obtain accurate results. In the first part of this second phase of CAST, {sup 4}He was used and the axion mass region was extended up to 0.39 eV, a part of phase space favored by axion models. In CAST's ongoing {sup 3}He phase the studied mass range is now being extended further. In this contribution the final results of CAST's {sup 4}He phase will be presented and the current status of the {sup 3}He run will be given. This includes latest results as well as prospects of future axion experiments.

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7 p. (0.3 MB)

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PDF-file: 7 pages; size: 0.3 Mbytes

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  • Presented at: IEEE NSS MIC 2010, Knoxville, TN, United States, Oct 30 - Nov 06, 2010

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  • Report No.: LLNL-PROC-462154
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1018749
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc839897

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  • November 11, 2010

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • April 17, 2017, 12:59 p.m.

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Vogel, J K; Pivovaroff, M J; Soufli, R; van Bibber, K & CAST, C. Probing the eV-Mass Range for Solar Axions with CAST, article, November 11, 2010; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc839897/: accessed November 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.