Pump Outs, General and D0 Considerations

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Seal Pump Outs (PO) are provided by specifically designing and providing redundant, or double, seals to create an annular volume that can be '(vacuum) pumped out' to test the integrity of both seals. The value of the technique is most readily apparent in the construction of large piping systems or vessels whose closure is on a different schedule than the nozzle closures, or whose nozzles are serially closed. In the case of D0, for instance, the high voltage boxes were put in place and leak checked before the vessel was closed and independent of the other nozzles. PO use is ... continued below

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7 pages

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Mulholland, G.T. December 25, 1990.

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Description

Seal Pump Outs (PO) are provided by specifically designing and providing redundant, or double, seals to create an annular volume that can be '(vacuum) pumped out' to test the integrity of both seals. The value of the technique is most readily apparent in the construction of large piping systems or vessels whose closure is on a different schedule than the nozzle closures, or whose nozzles are serially closed. In the case of D0, for instance, the high voltage boxes were put in place and leak checked before the vessel was closed and independent of the other nozzles. PO use is by no means limited to cryogenics and the supporting vacuum systems, but the discussion here will be limited to cryogenic applications. POs come in two generic service types; installation, and installation and monitor. The above high voltage box is an example of a static installation service application. Once the item is installed the PO can be, and almost universally is, capped, and revisited only on disassembly and reassembly. POs are constantly monitored after installation only when their seals, through cooldown gradient induced motion, vibration, cyclic load bolt seating, or other dynamic phenomena may degrade in performance over time. PO seals come in two general temperature service types; ambient and cryogenic temperatures. 'O' rings are the predominant warm seal. 'C', and other (Conoseal, Conflat, soft copper, etc.) metal seals (of copper, Inconel, indium, lead, stainless steel, alone or in combination) make up the usual field of cold seals. The much smaller class of cold seals made of metal spring activated Teflon or other spring activated seal materials have not been used here and will not be further addressed. In cryogenic work there are four regions that can be interfaced; cryogenic (cold), vacuum, atmosphere, and warm to cold transition nozzles (nozzle). Taken two at a time the four provide 10 possible interfaces. Table 1. lists the typical applications when PO are used, as practiced and known to the author. The greatest numbers of nozzle seal applications are standard bayonets, but with only one (warm) seal they are excluded from consideration in Table 1.

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7 pages

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-D0-EN-274
  • Grant Number: AC02-07CH11359
  • DOI: 10.2172/1031821 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1031821
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc837358

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  • December 25, 1990

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • Aug. 30, 2016, 6:22 p.m.

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Mulholland, G.T. Pump Outs, General and D0 Considerations, report, December 25, 1990; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc837358/: accessed December 14, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.