AVOID BECOMING A VICTIM OF COUNTERFEIT ITEMS

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In today's globalized economy, we cannot live without imported products. Most people do not realize how thin the safety net of regulation and inspection really is. Less than three percent of imported products receive any form of government inspection prior to sale. Avoid flea markets, street vendors and deep discount stores. The sellers of counterfeit wares know where to market their products. They look for individuals who are hungry for a brand name item but do not want to pay a brand name price for it. The internet provides anonymity to the sellers of counterfeit products. Unlike Europe, U.S. law ... continued below

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RD, WARRINER July 13, 2011.

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  • Hanford Site (Wash.)
    Publisher Info: Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States))
    Place of Publication: Richland, Washington

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In today's globalized economy, we cannot live without imported products. Most people do not realize how thin the safety net of regulation and inspection really is. Less than three percent of imported products receive any form of government inspection prior to sale. Avoid flea markets, street vendors and deep discount stores. The sellers of counterfeit wares know where to market their products. They look for individuals who are hungry for a brand name item but do not want to pay a brand name price for it. The internet provides anonymity to the sellers of counterfeit products. Unlike Europe, U.S. law does not hold internet-marketing organizations, responsible for the quality of the products sold on their websites. These organizations will remove an individual vendor when a sufficient number of complaints are lodged, but they will not take responsibility for the counterfeit products you may have purchased. EBay has a number of counterfeit product guides to help you avoid being a victim of the sellers of these products. Ten percent of all medications taken worldwide are counterfeit. If you do buy medications on-line, be sure that the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites (VIPPS) recommends the pharmacy you choose to use. Inspect all medication purchases and report any change in color, shape, imprinting or odor to your pharmacist. If you take generic medications these attributes may change from one manufacturer to another. Your pharmacist should inform you of any changes when you refill your prescription. If they do not, get clarification prior to taking the medication. Please note that the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate supplements. The FDA only steps in when a specific supplement proves to cause physical harm or contains a regulated ingredient. Due to counterfeiting, Underwriters Laboratories (UL) changed their label design three times since 1996. The new gold label should be attached to the cord or body of most office and home electrical products (please see the picture to the left). Holiday lights may have the UL marking in red or green instead of the universal black. A red UL mark indicates the product is approved for outdoor as well as indoor service. The green UL mark indicates the product is only to be used indoors. A small number of home electrical products may bear an Interteck (ETL) approval. This label is also acceptable. An Interteck label includes black print on a white background bearing the circular ETL logo. Most manufacturers are proud of their products and strive to gain name recognition as well as foster repeat business. This is not true of counterfeiters. The very first thing most counterfeiters try to do is make their products untraceable. Their products may bear the nation of origin but that is all. This is a common practice with metal components such as pipe fittings and flanges. This is also true of hoisting and rigging equipment such as shackles, turnbuckles and chain. Sadly, this has also occurred with the purchase of some safety equipment such as arc-flash retardant coveralls. Learn the national standards associated with products you are purchasing. Clearly specify these requirements on the procurements you make.

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  • FULL PAPER WRITTEN AFTER A SUSPECT/COUNTERFEIT PRESENTATION TO PNNL

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  • Report No.: CHPRC-01473-FP Rev 0
  • Grant Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1024891
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc836880

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • July 13, 2011

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • July 25, 2016, 6:20 p.m.

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RD, WARRINER. AVOID BECOMING A VICTIM OF COUNTERFEIT ITEMS, article, July 13, 2011; Richland, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc836880/: accessed November 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.