D0 Silicon Upgrade: Thermal Conductivity Measurements of a Variety of Epoxies and Greases Used for CDF/D0 Silicon Detector Ladder Construction

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The bulk thermal conductivity of several epoxy mixtures was measured with a setup at Lab D. Samples are prepared by using two aluminum cylinders of 3/4-inch diameter. The cylinders have holes drilled in them for insertion of temperature sensors (0.040-inch diameter thermistors), a heating element (standard resistor), and a tapped hole for heat sinking to a plate. The two cylinders are held together during gluing, and the thickness of the glue bead is controlled by using a shim of kapton tape, nominally 3.5 mils thickness per ply of tape. A resistor is glued into the hole using 5 minute epoxy. ... continued below

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5 pages

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Gillespie, Gordie; Jostlein, Hans; Ratzmann, Paul & /Fermilab January 12, 1996.

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The bulk thermal conductivity of several epoxy mixtures was measured with a setup at Lab D. Samples are prepared by using two aluminum cylinders of 3/4-inch diameter. The cylinders have holes drilled in them for insertion of temperature sensors (0.040-inch diameter thermistors), a heating element (standard resistor), and a tapped hole for heat sinking to a plate. The two cylinders are held together during gluing, and the thickness of the glue bead is controlled by using a shim of kapton tape, nominally 3.5 mils thickness per ply of tape. A resistor is glued into the hole using 5 minute epoxy. Care is taken to avoid shorting the leads to the aluminum cylinder. Once the sample is prepared, the sample is fixed to the heat sink using the tapped hole provided. Thermistors are carefully inserted into the four holes. Once set up, the data acquisition program is run for a half-hour prior to turning on the heater power. This is done to ensure that all temperatures stabilize, and this is checked when doing the analysis. The power is then turned on and run until the temperatures have stabilized, which takes two additional hours. The data acquisition program outputs the four measured temperatures in the form of a voltage. which is read across the thermistor. With known temperatures, a known geometry, and known joint thickness, the temperature drop across the joint can be extrapolated and the bulk thermal conductivity of the interface material can be calculated. The power is measured directly using an ammeter in series with the power supply, and measuring the voltage across the resistor while powered up. The resistor value is measured using a hand held device in order to cross-correlate the measurements. The voltage and current are independently measured using the data acquisition program. Their product has been consistently found to be a factor of 10.7 {+-} 0.1 lower than the manual measurement of power and has proven to be a good cross-check to the measurement of the power dissipation (the current and voltage readouts to the acquisition program are stepped down with series and parallel resistors, hence off by a factor). The gradient within the aluminum yields the thermal conductivity of the aluminum, knowing the power and geometry of the piece. The measured aluminum conductivity has been consistently 207 W/m-K with a standard deviation of 13 W/m-K for a large number of measurements, in good agreement with published values. This calculation provides additional cross-check as to the validity of the measurement.

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5 pages

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-D0-EN-444
  • Grant Number: AC02-07CH11359
  • DOI: 10.2172/1033287 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1033287
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc836383

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • January 12, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • Aug. 30, 2016, 2:54 p.m.

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Gillespie, Gordie; Jostlein, Hans; Ratzmann, Paul & /Fermilab. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Thermal Conductivity Measurements of a Variety of Epoxies and Greases Used for CDF/D0 Silicon Detector Ladder Construction, report, January 12, 1996; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc836383/: accessed January 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.